Openly accessible

Safety and efficacy of routine postoperative ibuprofen for pain and disability related to ectopic bone formation after hip replacement surgery (HIPAID): a randomised control trial

Fransen, Marlene, Andreson, Craig, Douglas, Jan, McMahon, Stephen, Neal, Bruce, Norton, Robyn, Woodward, Mark, Cameron, Ian D., Crawford, Ross, Lo, Sing Kai, Tregonning, Garnet and Windolf, Margaret 2006, Safety and efficacy of routine postoperative ibuprofen for pain and disability related to ectopic bone formation after hip replacement surgery (HIPAID): a randomised control trial, BMJ, vol. 333, no. 7567, pp. 519-524.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
lo-safetyandefficacy-2006.pdf Published version application/pdf 301.50KB 107

Title Safety and efficacy of routine postoperative ibuprofen for pain and disability related to ectopic bone formation after hip replacement surgery (HIPAID): a randomised control trial
Author(s) Fransen, Marlene
Andreson, Craig
Douglas, Jan
McMahon, Stephen
Neal, Bruce
Norton, Robyn
Woodward, Mark
Cameron, Ian D.
Crawford, Ross
Lo, Sing Kai
Tregonning, Garnet
Windolf, Margaret
Journal name BMJ
Volume number 333
Issue number 7567
Start page 519
End page 524
Publisher B M J Publishing
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2006-09-09
ISSN 0959-535X
1468-5833
Keyword(s) ibuprofen
nonsteroid antiinflammatory agent
total hip prosthesis
replacement hip
Summary Objectives To determine the benefits and risks of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) as prophylaxis for ectopic bone formation in patients undergoing total hip replacement (or revision) surgery.
Design Double blind randomised placebo controlled clinical trial, stratified by treatment site and surgery (primary or revision).
Setting 20 orthopaedic surgery centres in Australia and New Zealand.
Participants 902 patients undergoing elective primary or revision total hip replacement surgery.
Intervention 14 days' treatment with ibuprofen (1200 mg daily) or matching placebo started within 24 hours of surgery.
Main outcome measures Changes in self reported hip pain and physical function 6 to 12 months after surgery (Western Ontario and McMaster University Arthritis index).
Results There were no significant differences between the groups for improvements in hip pain (mean difference -0.1, 95% confidence interval -0.4 to 0.2, P = 0.6) or physical function (-0.1, -0.4 to 0.2, P = 0.5), despite a decreased risk of ectopic bone formation (relative risk 0.69, 0.56 to 0.83) associated with ibuprofen. There was a significantly increased risk of major bleeding complications in the ibuprofen group during the admission period (2.09, 1.00 to 4.39).
Conclusions
These data do not support the use of routine prophylaxis with NSAIDs in patients undergoing total hip replacement surgery.
Trial registration NCT00145730.
Language eng
Field of Research 111502 Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Socio Economic Objective 860899 Human Pharmaceutical Products not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2006, BMJ Publishing Group Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009134

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 23 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 36 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 505 Abstract Views, 107 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 13 Oct 2008, 15:52:06 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.