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A provisional database for the silicon content of foods in the United Kingdom

Powell, J. J., McNaughton, S.A, Jugdaohsingh, R., Anderson, S. H. C., Dear, J., Khot, F., Mowatt, L., Gleason, K. L., Sykes, M., Thompson, R. P. H., Bolton-Smith, C. and Hodson, M. J. 2005, A provisional database for the silicon content of foods in the United Kingdom, British journal of nutrition : an international journal of nutritional science, vol. 94, pp. 804-812, doi: 10.1079/BJN20051542.

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Title A provisional database for the silicon content of foods in the United Kingdom
Author(s) Powell, J. J.
McNaughton, S.AORCID iD for McNaughton, S.A orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Jugdaohsingh, R.
Anderson, S. H. C.
Dear, J.
Khot, F.
Mowatt, L.
Gleason, K. L.
Sykes, M.
Thompson, R. P. H.
Bolton-Smith, C.
Hodson, M. J.
Journal name British journal of nutrition : an international journal of nutritional science
Volume number 94
Start page 804
End page 812
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2005-11
ISSN 0007-1145
1475-2662
Keyword(s) dietary silicon
food composition
human health
Summary Si may play an important role in bone formation and connective tissue metabolism. Although biological interest in this element has recently increased, limited literature exists on the Si content of foods. To further our knowledge and understanding of the relationship between dietary Si and human health, a reliable food composition database, relevant for the UK population, is required. A total of 207 foods and beverages, commonly consumed in the UK, were analysed for Si content. Composite samples were analysed using inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectrometry following microwave-assisted digestion with nitric acid and H2O2. The highest concentrations of Si were found in cereals and cereal products, especially less refined cereals and oat-based products. Fruit and vegetables were highly variable sources of Si with substantial amounts present in Kenyan beans, French beans, runner beans, spinach, dried fruit, bananas and red lentils, but undetectable amounts in tomatoes, oranges and onions. Of the beverages, beer, a macerated whole-grain cereal product, contained the greatest level of Si, whilst drinking water was a variable source with some mineral waters relatively high in Si. The present study provides a provisional database for the Si content of UK foods, which will allow the estimation of dietary intakes of Si in the UK population and investigation into the role of dietary Si in human health.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1079/BJN20051542
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009138

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.