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Zebrafish SPI-1 marks a site of myeloid development independent of primitive erythropoiesis: implications for axial patterning.

Lieschke, Graham J., Oates, Andrew C., Paw, Barry H., Thompson, Margaret A., Hall, Nathan E., Ward, Alister, Ho, Robert K., Zon, Leonard I. and Layton, Judith E. 2002, Zebrafish SPI-1 marks a site of myeloid development independent of primitive erythropoiesis: implications for axial patterning., Developmental biology, vol. 246, no. 2, pp. 274-295.

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Title Zebrafish SPI-1 marks a site of myeloid development independent of primitive erythropoiesis: implications for axial patterning.
Author(s) Lieschke, Graham J.
Oates, Andrew C.
Paw, Barry H.
Thompson, Margaret A.
Hall, Nathan E.
Ward, Alister
Ho, Robert K.
Zon, Leonard I.
Layton, Judith E.
Journal name Developmental biology
Volume number 246
Issue number 2
Start page 274
End page 295
Publisher Academic Press
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2002-06-15
ISSN 0012-1606
Keyword(s) danio rerio
hematopoiesis
myelopoiesis
lateral plate mesoderm
SPI-1
bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)
PU.1
Summary The mammalian transcription factor SPI-1 (synonyms: SPI1, PU.1, or Sfpi1) plays a critical role in myeloid development. To examine early myeloid commitment in the zebrafish embryo, we isolated a gene from zebrafish that is a SPI-1 orthologue on the basis of homology and phylogenetic considerations. The zebrafish spi1 (pu1) gene was first expressed at 12 h postfertilization in rostral lateral plate mesoderm (LPM), anatomically isolated from erythroid development in caudal lateral plate mesoderm. Fate-mapping traced rostral LPM cells from the region of initial spi1 expression to a myeloid fate. spi1 expression was lost in the bloodless mutant cloche, but rostral spi1 expression and myeloid development were preserved in the mutant spadetail, despite its complete erythropoietic failure. This dissociation of myeloid and erythroid development was further explored in studies of embryos overexpressing BMP-4, or chordin, in bmp-deficient swirl and snailhouse mutants, and chordin-deficient chordino mutants. These studies demonstrate that, in zebrafish, spi1 marks a rostral population of LPM cells committed to a myeloid fate anatomically separated from and developmentally independent of erythroid commitment in the caudal LPM. Such complete anatomical and developmental dissociation of two hematopoietic lineages adds an interesting complexity to the understanding of vertebrate hematopoietic development and presents significant implications for the mechanisms regulating axial patterning.
Notes Available online 11 June 2002.
Language eng
Field of Research 110202 Haematology
Socio Economic Objective 970110 Expanding Knowledge in Technology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2002, Elsevier Science (USA).
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009177

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.