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Properties of ectin isolated from Lawulu (Crysophylum roxbergi G Don) and development of jam and fruit leather using Lawulu and pineapple

Malangani, K.G.P. and Gamlath, Shirani 2001, Properties of ectin isolated from Lawulu (Crysophylum roxbergi G Don) and development of jam and fruit leather using Lawulu and pineapple, Tropic agricultural research, vol. 13, pp. 51-60.

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Title Properties of ectin isolated from Lawulu (Crysophylum roxbergi G Don) and development of jam and fruit leather using Lawulu and pineapple
Formatted title Properties of ectin isolated from Lawulu (Crysophylum roxbergi G Don) and development of jam and fruit leather using Lawulu and pineapple
Author(s) Malangani, K.G.P.
Gamlath, Shirani
Journal name Tropic agricultural research
Volume number 13
Start page 51
End page 60
Publisher University of Peradeniya
Place of publication Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
Publication date 2001
ISSN 1016-1422
Summary Lawulu fruit (Crysophylum roxberghi GDon) possess nutritional, medicinal and functional properties. However, it is less consumed due to its  characteristic off flavour. The present study was carried out to investigate the potential of utilizing lawulu fruit for isolation of pectin and to develop jam and fruit leather. Products were evaluated based on physico-chemical and sensory properties.

Pectin isolated fromf irm ripe lawuluf ruit using 0.1 M hydrochloric acid  followed by 96% ethanol precipitation yielded 7. 3% pectin on wet weight basis and 26.1% on dry weight basis. The isolated pectin contained 0.74% ash, 0.02% acetyl content and 7.85% methoxyl content with equivalent weight 993.5. These values were comparable with commercial high methoxyl pectin. In addition, Iawulu pectin at 1.5% concentration formed a gel within 12-14 min in the presence of 68% sucrose and 0.5% citric acid.

Jam was prepared by using Iawulu-pineapple ratio as 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1 respectively. The gel strength of jam (650 Brix and pH 3.1) at 0.35% commercial high methoxyl pectin was comparable with commercial mixed fruit jam. Sensory evaluation indicated a significant preference (p<.05) for jam containing lawulu-pineapple ratio of 1:2 and 1.1 respectively overthe ratio of 2:1. With increased lawulu percentage both yellowness and lightness of jam increased significantly (p<0.05).

Fruit leather was prepared by changing lawulu-pineapple ratio as 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1 respectively with 20% sucrose, 0.3% citric acid, 0.05% pectin and 100 ppm potassium metabisulphite followed by drying at 65±10C for 12-14 h. Sensory evaluation data revealed that changes in lawulu-pineapple ratio had no significant effect on taste, texture and overall quality of fruit leather.   However, significant preference (p<0.05) for colour was observed with increasing lawulu percentage. Both yellowness (b' value) and lightness (L'value) of fruit leather were sign[icantly increased (p<0.05) with increasing lawulu percentage.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 090805 Food Processing
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2001, University of Peradeniya
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009239

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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