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A cross-national comparison of school drug policies in Washington State, United States, and Victoria, Australia

Beyers, Jennifer M., Evans-Whipp, Tracy, Mathers, Megan, Toumbourou, John and Catalano, Richard F. 2005, A cross-national comparison of school drug policies in Washington State, United States, and Victoria, Australia, Journal of school health, vol. 75, no. 4, pp. 134-140, doi: 10.1111/j.1746-1561.2005.00011.x.

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Title A cross-national comparison of school drug policies in Washington State, United States, and Victoria, Australia
Author(s) Beyers, Jennifer M.
Evans-Whipp, Tracy
Mathers, Megan
Toumbourou, JohnORCID iD for Toumbourou, John orcid.org/0000-0002-8431-3762
Catalano, Richard F.
Journal name Journal of school health
Volume number 75
Issue number 4
Start page 134
End page 140
Publisher Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2005-04
ISSN 0022-4391
1746-1561
Keyword(s) Health education
School children -- Health and hygiene
Summary Using mail survey data collected from primary and secondary school administrators in Washington State, United States, and in Victoria, Australia, this study compared aspects of the school drug policy environment in the 2 states. Documented substance-use policies were prevalent in Washington and Victoria but less prevalent in primary schools, especially in Victoria. Victorian school policy-setting processes were significantly more likely to involve teachers, parents, and students than processes in Washington schools. Consistent with expectations based on their respective national drug policy frameworks, school drug policies in Washington schools were more oriented toward total abstinence and more frequently enforced with harsh punishment (such as expulsion or calling law enforcement), whereas policies in Victorian schools were more reflective of harm-minimization principles. Within both states, however, schools more regularly used harsh punishment and remediation consequences for alcohol and illicit-drug violations compared to tobacco policy violations, which were treated more leniently. (J Sch Health. 2005;75(4):134-140)
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1746-1561.2005.00011.x
Field of Research 170113 Social and Community Psychology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, American School Health Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009258

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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