You are not logged in.

The effect of school suspensions and arrests on subsequent adolescent antisocial behavior in Australia and the United States

Hemphill, Sheryl, Toumbourou, John, Herrenkohl, Todd, McMorris, Barbara and Catalano, Richard 2006, The effect of school suspensions and arrests on subsequent adolescent antisocial behavior in Australia and the United States, Journal of adolescent health, vol. 39, no. 5, pp. 736-744, doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2006.05.010.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The effect of school suspensions and arrests on subsequent adolescent antisocial behavior in Australia and the United States
Author(s) Hemphill, Sheryl
Toumbourou, JohnORCID iD for Toumbourou, John orcid.org/0000-0002-8431-3762
Herrenkohl, Todd
McMorris, Barbara
Catalano, Richard
Journal name Journal of adolescent health
Volume number 39
Issue number 5
Start page 736
End page 744
Publisher Elsevier Science Pub. Co.
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2006-11
ISSN 1054-139x
1879-1972
Keyword(s) Adolescence
Antisocial behavior
Risk factors
Protective factors
Sanctions
Predictors
Youth
Summary Purpose: To examine the effect of school suspensions and arrests (i.e., being taken into police custody) on subsequent adolescent antisocial behavior such as violence and crime, after controlling for established risk and protective factors in Victoria, Australia and Washington State, United States (U.S.). Methods: This article reports on analyses of two points of data collected 1 year apart within a cross-national longitudinal study of the development of antisocial behavior, substance use, and related behaviors in approximately 4000 students aged 12 to 16 years in Victoria, Australia and Washington State, U.S. Students completed a modified version of the Communities That Care self-report survey of behavior, as well as risk and protective factors across five domains (individual, family, peer, school, and community). Multivariate logistic regression analyses investigate the effect of school suspensions and arrests on subsequent antisocial behavior, holding constant individual, family, peer, school, and community level influences such as being female, student belief in the moral order, emotional control, and attachment to mother. Results: At the first assessment, school suspensions and arrests were more commonly reported in Washington, and school suspensions significantly increased the likelihood of antisocial behavior 12 months later, after holding constant established risk and protective factors (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–2.1, p < .05). Predictors of antisocial behavior spanned risk and protective factors across five individual and ecological areas of risk. Risk factors in this study were pre-existing antisocial behavior (OR 3.6, CI 2.7–4.7, p < .001), association with antisocial peers (OR 1.8, CI 1.4–2.4, p < .001), academic failure (OR 1.3, CI 1.1–1.5, p < .01), and perceived availability of drugs in the community (OR 1.3, CI 1.1–1.5, p < .001). Protective factors included being female (OR 0.7, CI 0.5–0.9, p < .01), student belief in the moral order (OR 0.8, CI 0.6–1.0, p < .05), student emotional control (OR 0.7, CI 0.6–0.8, p < .001), and attachment to mother (OR 0.8, CI 0.7–1.0, p < .05). Conclusions:  School suspensions may increase the likelihood of future antisocial behavior. Further research is required to both replicate this finding and establish the mechanisms by which school suspensions exert their effects.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2006.05.010
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Society for Adolescent Medicine
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009283

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 66 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 75 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 700 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 13 Oct 2008, 15:56:25 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.