Energy system contribution during 200- to 1500-m running in highly trained athletes

Spencer, Matt and Gastin, Paul 2001, Energy system contribution during 200- to 1500-m running in highly trained athletes, Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 157-162.

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Title Energy system contribution during 200- to 1500-m running in highly trained athletes
Author(s) Spencer, Matt
Gastin, Paul
Journal name Medicine and science in sports and exercise
Volume number 33
Issue number 1
Start page 157
End page 162
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Madison, Wis.
Publication date 2001-01
ISSN 0195-9131
1530-0315
Keyword(s) maximal accumulated oxygen deficit
oxygen demand
anaerobic capicity
submaximal
supramaximal
Summary Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to profile the aerobic and anaerobic energy system contribution during high-speed treadmill exercise that simulated 200-, 400-, 800-, and 1500-m track running events.

Methods: Twenty highly trained athletes (Australian National Standard) participated in the study, specializing in either the 200-m (N = 3), 400-m (N = 6), 800-m (N = 5), or 1500-m (N = 6) event (mean O2 peak [mL·kg-1·min-1] ± SD = 56 ± 2, 59 ± 1, 67 ± 1, and 72 ± 2, respectively). The relative aerobic and anaerobic energy system contribution was calculated using the accumulated oxygen deficit (AOD) method.

Results: The relative contribution of the aerobic energy system to the 200-, 400-, 800-, and 1500-m events was 29 ± 4, 43 ± 1, 66 ± 2, and 84 ± 1% ± SD, respectively. The size of the AOD increased with event duration during the 200-, 400-, and 800-m events (30.4 ± 2.3, 41.3 ± 1.0, and 48.1 ± 4.5 mL·kg-1, respectively), but no further increase was seen in the 1500-m event (47.1 ± 3.8 mL·kg-1). The crossover to predominantly aerobic energy system supply occurred between 15 and 30 s for the 400-, 800-, and 1500-m events.

Conclusions: These results suggest that the relative contribution of the aerobic energy system during track running events is considerable and greater than traditionally thought.
Language eng
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2001, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009286

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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