Openly accessible

Macronutrient innovations: the role of fats and sterols in human health

Li, Duo and Sinclair, Andrew 2002, Macronutrient innovations: the role of fats and sterols in human health, Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 11, no. S6, pp. S155-S162.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
sinclair-macronutrientinnovations-2002.pdf Published version application/pdf 608.61KB 151

Title Macronutrient innovations: the role of fats and sterols in human health
Author(s) Li, Duo
Sinclair, Andrew
Journal name Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 11
Issue number S6
Start page S155
End page S162
Publisher HEC Press
Place of publication McKinnon, Vic.
Publication date 2002
ISSN 0964-7058
1440-6047
Keyword(s) blood pressure
cancer
diabetes mellitus
fat
inflammation
lipoprotein lipids
neuropsychiatric disorders
obesity
sterol
thrombosis
Summary Dietary intake of fats and sterols has long been known to play a critical role in human health. High proportions of saturated fat, which increase blood cholesterol levels, are mainly found in animal fat and some plant oil (e.g. cocoa butter, palm oil etc.). The predominant polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in the Western diet is linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6), an essential fatty acid, which is commonly found in vegetable seed oils. This is the parent fatty acid of n-6 series PUFA, which can be converted in vivo to C20 and C22 n-6 long chain (LC) PUFA. α‐linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n-3) is less abundant than LA and is another essential fatty acid; ALA is also present in some vegetable oils such as perilla, flaxseed, canola, soybean and walnut oils, and is the precursor of C20 and C22 n-3 LC PUFA. Sterols are widely distributed in animal tissue and plants, with cholesterol being the major sterol in animal tissue and β-sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol being the main sterols in plants. It has long been recognized that an increased dietary intake of saturated fat and (to a lesser extent) cholesterol, raises plasma/serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and PUFA decreases these levels. Results from recent studies have shown that plasma/serum levels of lipids and lipoprotein lipids can also be decreased by plant sterols (phytosterols) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, cis-9,trans-11−18:2) has been reported to have anticancer and antidiabetic activities. Fat as the DAG form has also been reported to have anti-obesity effects. Omega-3 PUFA have a beneficial effect on increased heart rate variability, decreased risk of stroke, reduction of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and may be effective in managing depression in adults. Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and phytosterols have an anti-inflammatory activity. The GLA, when combined with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have been reported to have a beneficial effect in hyperactive children. These data show that various lipids are powerful bioactive compounds.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2002, HEC Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009294

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 387 Abstract Views, 151 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 13 Oct 2008, 15:56:45 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.