Burden of disease and injury in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations in the Northern Territory

Zhao, Yuejen, Gutheridge, Steve, Magnus, Anne and Vos, Theo 2004, Burden of disease and injury in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations in the Northern Territory, Medical journal of Australia, vol. 180, no. 10, pp. 498-502.

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Title Burden of disease and injury in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations in the Northern Territory
Author(s) Zhao, Yuejen
Gutheridge, Steve
Magnus, Anne
Vos, Theo
Journal name Medical journal of Australia
Volume number 180
Issue number 10
Start page 498
End page 502
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing
Place of publication Glebe, NSW
Publication date 2004-05-17
ISSN 0025-729X
1326-5377
Summary Objective:
To quantify the burden of disease and injury for the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations in the Northern Territory.

Design and setting:
Analysis of Northern Territory data for 1 January 1994 to 30 December 1998 from multiple sources.

Main outcome measures:
Disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), by age, sex, cause and Aboriginality.

Results:
Cardiovascular disease was the leading contributor (14.9%) to the total burden of disease and injury in the NT, followed by mental disorders (14.5%) and malignant neoplasms (11.2%). There was also a substantial contribution from unintentional injury (10.4%) and intentional injury (4.9%). Overall, the NT Aboriginal population had a rate of burden of disease 2.5 times higher than the non-Aboriginal population; in the 35-54-year age group their DALY rate was 4.1 times higher. The leading causes of disease burden were cardiovascular disease for both Aboriginal men (19.1%) and women (15.7%) and mental disorders for both non-Aboriginal men (16.7%) and women (22.3%).

Conclusions:
A comprehensive assessment of fatal and non-fatal conditions is important in describing differentials in health status of the NT population. Our study provides comparative data to identify health priorities and facilitate a more equitable distribution of health funding.


Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004 The Medical Journal of Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009313

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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