The significance of transfusion in the past as a risk for current hepatitis B and Hepatitis C infection: a study in endoscopy patients

Tawk, Hani M., Vickery, Karen, Bisset, Linda, Lo, Sing Kai and Cossart, Yvonne E. 2005, The significance of transfusion in the past as a risk for current hepatitis B and Hepatitis C infection: a study in endoscopy patients, Transfusion, vol. 45, no. 5, pp. 807-813.

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Title The significance of transfusion in the past as a risk for current hepatitis B and Hepatitis C infection: a study in endoscopy patients
Author(s) Tawk, Hani M.
Vickery, Karen
Bisset, Linda
Lo, Sing Kai
Cossart, Yvonne E.
Journal name Transfusion
Volume number 45
Issue number 5
Start page 807
End page 813
Publisher Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
Place of publication Malden, Mass
Publication date 2005-04
ISSN 0041-1132
1537-2995
Summary BACKGROUND: The objective was to determine the contribution of transfusion in the past to the risk of current infection with hepatitis B or C among patients attending a large hospital for endoscopic procedures.
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Blood samples had been tested for hepatitis markers by routine methods. Patients completed a comprehensive risk factor questionnaire and results were analyzed using computer software.
RESULTS: Twenty-seven percent of the 2120 participants in the study received transfusions in the past. There was no increase in prevalence of hepatitis B among those transfused. Compared with nontransfused participants, recipients of blood before the implementation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening in 1990 had a 4.6-fold increased risk of HCV infection, whereas those transfused with screened blood had a 3-fold increased risk. The difference between the odds ratios for patients before and after screening was not significant.
CONCLUSIONS: Because screening has almost completely eliminated HCV from the blood supply, our finding of a continuing association of HCV infection with transfusion was unexpected. It implies that there are significant other nosocomial risks for hepatitis C transmission associated with the clinical situations where patients received blood. These should be actively investigated.
Language eng
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©1999-2008 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009362

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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