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Lean meat and heart health

Li, Duo, Siriamornpun, Sirithon, Wahlqvist, Mark L., Mann, Neil J. and Sinclair, Andrew 2005, Lean meat and heart health, Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 113-119.

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Title Lean meat and heart health
Author(s) Li, Duo
Siriamornpun, Sirithon
Wahlqvist, Mark L.
Mann, Neil J.
Sinclair, Andrew
Journal name Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition
Volume number 14
Issue number 2
Start page 113
End page 119
Publisher HEC Press
Place of publication McKinnon, Vic.
Publication date 2005
ISSN 0964-7058
1440-6047
Keyword(s) nuts
meat
heart disease
CHD risk factors
LDL cholesterol
saturated fat
polyunsaturated fatty acids
Summary The general health message to the public about meat consumption is both confusing and misleading. It is stated that meat is not good for health because meat is rich in fat and cholesterol and high intakes are associated with increased blood cholesterol levels and coronary heart disease (CHD). This paper reviewed 54 studies from the literature in relation to red meat consumption and CHD risk factors. Substantial evidence from recent studies shows that lean red meat trimmed of visible fat does not raise total blood cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels. Dietary intake of total and saturated fat mainly comes from fast foods, snack foods, oils, spreads, other processed foods and the visible fat of meat, rather than lean meat. In fact, lean red meat is low in saturated fat, and if consumed in a diet low in SFA is associated with reductions in LDL-cholesterol in both healthy and hypercholesterolemia subjects. Lean red meat consumption has no effect on in vivo and ex vivo production of thromboxane and prostacyclin or the activity of haemostatic factors. Lean red meat is also a good source of protein, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B12, niacin, zinc and iron. In conclusion, lean red meat, trimmed of visible fat, which is consumed in a diet low in saturated fat does not increase cardiovascular risk factors (plasma cholesterol levels or thrombotic risk factors).

Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, HEC Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009376

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.