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Changing risk behaviours for non-communicable disease in New Zealand working men - is workplace intervention effective?

Cook, C., Swinburn, Boyd and Stewart, J. 2001, Changing risk behaviours for non-communicable disease in New Zealand working men - is workplace intervention effective?, New Zealand medical journal, vol. 114, no. 1130, pp. 175-178.

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Title Changing risk behaviours for non-communicable disease in New Zealand working men - is workplace intervention effective?
Author(s) Cook, C.
Swinburn, Boyd
Stewart, J.
Journal name New Zealand medical journal
Volume number 114
Issue number 1130
Start page 175
End page 178
Publisher New Zealand Medical Association
Place of publication New Zealand
Publication date 2001-04-27
ISSN 0028-8446
1175-8716
Summary Aims. To evaluate the effectiveness of a health promotion
programme targeting dietary behaviours and physical
activity among male hourly-paid workers and to explore
demographic and attitudinal influences on dietary patterns
at baseline.
Methods. A controlled field trial compared workers at one
intervention and one control worksite. The intervention
comprised nutrition displays in the cafeteria and monthly
30-minute workshops for six months. Key outcome
measures at six and twelve-months were self-reported
dietary and lifestyle behaviours, nutrition knowledge, body
mass index (BMI), waist circumference and blood pressure.
Results. 132 men at the intervention site and 121 men at the
control site participated in the study and a high retention rate
(94% at 6-months and 89% at 12-months) was achieved. At
baseline, 40% of the total sample (253) were obese, 30% had
elevated blood pressure, 59% indicated an excessive fat intake
and 92% did not meet the recommended vegetable and fruit
intake. The intervention reduced fat intake, increased
vegetable intake and physical activity, improved nutrition
knowledge and reduced systolic blood pressure when
compared to the control site. There was no difference in
change in mean BMI or waist circumference. Reduction in
BMI was associated with reduction in fat intake.
Discussion. Low intensity workplace intervention can
significantly improve reported health behaviours and
nutrition knowledge although the impact on more
objective measures of risk was variable. A longer duration
or more intensive intervention may be required to achieve
further reduction in risk factors.
Language eng
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2001, New Zealand Medical Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009435

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.