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Effect of dietary fatty acids on the intestinal permeability of marker drug compounds in excised rat jejunum

Vine, D., Charman, S., Gibson, P., Sinclair, Andrew and Porter, C. 2002, Effect of dietary fatty acids on the intestinal permeability of marker drug compounds in excised rat jejunum, Journal of pharmacy and pharmacology:an international journal of pharmaceutical science, vol. 54, no. 6, pp. 809-819.

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Title Effect of dietary fatty acids on the intestinal permeability of marker drug compounds in excised rat jejunum
Author(s) Vine, D.
Charman, S.
Gibson, P.
Sinclair, Andrew
Porter, C.
Journal name Journal of pharmacy and pharmacology:an international journal of pharmaceutical science
Volume number 54
Issue number 6
Start page 809
End page 819
Publisher Pharmaceutical Press
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2002-06
ISSN 0022-3573
Summary The aim of this study was to explore the effects of diets containing saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA, respectively) on the passive and active transport properties of rat jejunum using marker compounds. Rats were fed diets supplemented with 18.4% (w/w) lipid (4 groups) or standard rat chow (1 group) for a period of 30 days. At the end of the dietary period, mucosal scrapings were taken for the determination of membrane phospholipids, and the apparent jejunal permeability of radiolabelled marker compounds was determined using modified Ussing chambers. Changes in the phospholipid content of the brush border membrane reflected the different lipid content of the diets. The passive paracellular permeability of mannitol was not significantly affected by the fatty acid composition of the diet, although there was a trend toward decreased mannitol permeability in the rats fed both the ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA diets. In comparison, the transcellular diffusion of diazepam was reduced by 20% (P < 0.05) in rats fed diets supplemented with ω-3 and ω-6 PUFA. In the lipid-fed rats, the serosal to mucosal flux of digoxin, an intestinal P-glycoprotein substrate, was reduced by 20% (P < 0.05) relative to the chow-fed group, however there were no significant differences between the different lipid groups. The active absorption of D-glucose via the Na+-dependent transport pathway was highest in the SFA, MUFA and PUFA ω-3 dietary groups, intermediate in the low-fat chow group and lowest in the PUFA ω-6 group, and was positively correlated with short-circuit current. These studies indicate that dietary fatty acid changes can result in moderate changes to the active and passive transport properties of excised rat jejunum.
Language eng
Field of Research 060199 Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2002, Pharmaceutical Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009447

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.