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Cancer patient preferences for communication of prognosis in the metastatic setting

Hagerty, Rebecca, Butow, Phyllis, Ellis, Peter, Lobb, Elizabeth, Pendlebury, Susan, Leighl, Natasha, Goldstein, David, Lo, Sing Kai and Tattersall, Martin 2004, Cancer patient preferences for communication of prognosis in the metastatic setting, Journal of clinical oncology, vol. 22, no. 9, pp. 1721-1730.

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Title Cancer patient preferences for communication of prognosis in the metastatic setting
Author(s) Hagerty, Rebecca
Butow, Phyllis
Ellis, Peter
Lobb, Elizabeth
Pendlebury, Susan
Leighl, Natasha
Goldstein, David
Lo, Sing Kai
Tattersall, Martin
Journal name Journal of clinical oncology
Volume number 22
Issue number 9
Start page 1721
End page 1730
Publisher American Society of Clinical Oncology
Place of publication Alexandria VA.
Publication date 2004-05-01
ISSN 0732-183X
1527-7755
Summary PURPOSE: To identify preferences for and predictors of prognostic information among patients with incurable metastatic cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred twenty-six metastatic cancer patients seeing 30 oncologists at 12 outpatient clinics in New South Wales, Australia, participated in the study. Patients were diagnosed with incurable metastatic disease within 6 weeks to 6 months of recruitment. Patients completed a survey eliciting their preferences for prognostic information, including type, quantity, mode, and timing of presentation; anxiety and depression levels; and information and involvement preferences. RESULTS: More than 95% of patients wanted information about side effects, symptoms, and treatment options. The majority wanted to know longest survival time with treatment (85%), 5-year survival rates (80%), and average survival (81%). Words and numbers were preferred over pie charts or graphs. Fifty-nine percent (59%) wanted to discuss expected survival when first diagnosed with metastatic disease. Thirty-eight percent and 44% wanted to negotiate when expected survival and dying, respectively, were discussed. Patients with higher depression scores were more likely to want to know shortest time to live without treatment (P = .047) and average survival (P = .049). Lower depression levels were significantly associated with never wanting to discuss expected survival (P = .03). Patients with an expected survival of years were more likely to want to discuss life expectancy when first diagnosed with metastases (P = .02). CONCLUSION: Most metastatic cancer patients want detailed prognostic information but prefer to negotiate the extent, format, and timing of the information they receive from their oncologists.
Language eng
Field of Research 111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, American Society of Clinical Oncology
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009456

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.