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Temporal changes in macroinvertebrate assemblages following experimental flooding in permanent and temporary wetlands in an Australian floodplain forest

Hillman, T. and Quinn, Gerald 2002, Temporal changes in macroinvertebrate assemblages following experimental flooding in permanent and temporary wetlands in an Australian floodplain forest, River research and applications, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 137-154, doi: 10.1002/rra.628.

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Title Temporal changes in macroinvertebrate assemblages following experimental flooding in permanent and temporary wetlands in an Australian floodplain forest
Author(s) Hillman, T.
Quinn, Gerald
Journal name River research and applications
Volume number 18
Issue number 2
Start page 137
End page 154
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Place of publication Malden, Mass.
Publication date 2002-03
ISSN 1535-1459
1535-1467
Keyword(s) Billabong
Flood
Floodplain
Flow management
Macroinvertebrate
Murray-Darling Basin
Succession
Temporary wetlands
Wetland
Summary The River Murray, Australia, is a highly regulated river from which almost 80% of mean annual flow is removed for human use, primarily irrigated agriculture. Consequent changes to the pattern and volume of river flow are reflected in floodplain hydrology and, therefore, the wetting/drying patterns of floodplain wetlands. To explore the significance of these changes, macroinvertebrate samples were compared between permanent and temporary wetlands following experimental flooding in a forested floodplain of the River Murray. Weekly samples from two permanent wetlands and four associated temporary sites were used to track changes in macroinvertebrate assemblage composition. Non-metric multidimensional scaling was used to ordinate the macroinvertebrate data, indicating consistent differences between the biota of permanent and temporary wetlands and between the initial and later assemblages in the temporary sites. There were marked changes over time, but little sign that the permanent and temporary assemblages were becoming more alike over the 25-week observation period. The apparent heterogeneity of these systems is of particular importance in developing river management plans which are likely to change flooding patterns. Such plans need to maintain a mosaic of wetland habitats if floodplain biodiversity is to be supported.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/rra.628
Field of Research 060204 Freshwater Ecology
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2002, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009465

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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