Brokering knowledge : managing knowledge in a network of government and non-government human service delivery agencies

Muetzelfeldt, Michael, Briskman, Linda and Jones, Martyn 2002, Brokering knowledge : managing knowledge in a network of government and non-government human service delivery agencies, in Knowledge, networks and joined-up government : conference proceedings from the International Political Science Association Committee, Structure and Organisation of Government Research, June 3-5, 2002, University of Melbourne, Australia, University of Melbourne, Centre for Public Policy, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 267-274.

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Title Brokering knowledge : managing knowledge in a network of government and non-government human service delivery agencies
Author(s) Muetzelfeldt, Michael
Briskman, Linda
Jones, Martyn
Conference name Conference on Knowledge, Networks and Joined-Up Government (2002 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 3-5 Jun. 2002
Title of proceedings Knowledge, networks and joined-up government : conference proceedings from the International Political Science Association Committee, Structure and Organisation of Government Research, June 3-5, 2002, University of Melbourne, Australia
Editor(s) Considine, Mark
Publication date 2002
Start page 267
End page 274
Publisher University of Melbourne, Centre for Public Policy
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary This paper examines aspects of knowledge management that are particularly important in the network of human service delivery agencies in Victoria. This network is characterised by four features: it is a cluster of networked organisations; professionals and others may act as knowledge brokers within and between organisations in the network; rapid change in both knowledge and organisation accentuates the importance of innovative knowledge and emergent organisation over and above routine instrumental knowledge within stable organisation; and consequently there is an underlying concern with dialogical rather than instrumental knowledge and its management, and particularly how it constitutes and is constituted by organisation. The paper describes the analytical tools that we consider particularly important in examining this situation – in particular, the distinction between instrumental and dialogical knowledge, and the role of knowledge brokers (and professionals as knowledge brokers). It concludes by relating this analysis to broader issues in organisation studies, and suggests paths for further examination of these issues.
ISBN 0732516196
9780732516192
Language eng
Field of Research 160510 Public Policy
Socio Economic Objective 910499 Management and Productivity not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009542

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Social and International Studies
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