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Investigating social marketing, benchmarking and public policy development in environmental management

Binney, W., Hall, John and Oppenheim, Peter 2004, Investigating social marketing, benchmarking and public policy development in environmental management, in Virtue in marketing : proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Conference, 6-9 July 2004, University of Gloucestershire Business School, University of Gloucestershire Business School, Cheltenham, England, pp. 1-12.

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Title Investigating social marketing, benchmarking and public policy development in environmental management
Author(s) Binney, W.
Hall, John
Oppenheim, Peter
Conference name Academy of Marketing. Conference (2004 : Cheltenham, England)
Conference location Cheltenham, England
Conference dates 6-9 July 2004
Title of proceedings Virtue in marketing : proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Conference, 6-9 July 2004, University of Gloucestershire Business School
Editor(s) Davis, Barry
Dermody, Janine
Publication date 2004
Conference series Academy of Marketing. Conference
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher University of Gloucestershire Business School
Place of publication Cheltenham, England
Keyword(s) social marketing
public policy
benchmarking
environmental management
Summary This paper discusses, an application of social marketing relating to pro-environmental awareness and social change. The integration of consumer behaviour theory into social marketing has been highlighted in the literature as requiring greater attention. Social marketing campaigns, like all marketing activities, rely on an understanding of stakeholders' attitudes and motivations in regard to the issue of concern, as well as towards the desired modified behaviour or lack of behaviour. The study highlights the marketing paradigms of benchmarking and social marketing in a not for profit governmental environment. Serrated Tussock has been designated as a weed of national significance and therefore the program has national implications (Thorp 2000). Even though issues associated with introduced species are less publicised than other environmental issues on the world stage, the associated environmental problems are no less severe than those caused by production and consumption activities. Weed control is a widespread problem facing individuals, communities and governments at all levels. A triangulatory approach, involving three distinct phases and incorporating both qualitative and quantitative tools, was used for the research design. The qualitative phase involved focus groups and in depth interviews with landholders, focus groups with professionals in the field and a focus group of key stakeholders. The mail survey resulted in a representative sample of 608 usable responses from the infestation area. The research conducted in this study illustrates how the various stages in the social marketing process were achieved and recommendations consistent with social marketing theory were generated.
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ISBN 1861741480
9781861741486
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009652

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.