Public environmental consumerism : recycling behaviour and its impact on intentions to purchase green products

D'Souza, Clare, Taghian, Mehdi and Lamb, Peter 2005, Public environmental consumerism : recycling behaviour and its impact on intentions to purchase green products, in Discourse, diversity and distinction : Macromarketing at 30 : Remember the titans, papers of the 30th Annual Macromarketing Conference, [University of South Florida], [St. Petersburg, Fla.], pp. 85-95.

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Title Public environmental consumerism : recycling behaviour and its impact on intentions to purchase green products
Author(s) D'Souza, Clare
Taghian, Mehdi
Lamb, Peter
Conference name Macromarketing Conference (30th: 2005: St. Petersburg, Florida)
Conference location St. Petersburgh, Florida
Conference dates 28-31 May 2005
Title of proceedings Discourse, diversity and distinction : Macromarketing at 30 : Remember the titans, papers of the 30th Annual Macromarketing Conference
Editor(s) Peterson, Mark
Hill, Ronald Paul
Publication date 2005
Conference series Macromarketing Society Conference
Start page 85
End page 95
Publisher [University of South Florida]
Place of publication [St. Petersburg, Fla.]
Summary Recycling behaviour has been used as indicators of green behavior since research has indicated that there is a positive relationship between environmental concern and ecologically responsible behavior such as recycling. The objective of this study is to find out if there is a difference between recyclers and non-recyclers and heavy and light recyclers with respect to their willingness to pay more for green products despite the perception of green products being of a lower quality in comparison to alternative products. The answers to this will help us to better understand environmentally conscious consumerism of both groups of consumers i.e. the light and heavy recyclers. The results indicate that willingness to pay somewhat higher prices and accepting somewhat lower quality of green products appears to be, generally, independent of recycling and non-recycling, as well as heavy and light recycling behaviour. It also addresses the implications of these findings for business managers.
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009678

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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