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What do they think when we stack them in? A comparative analysis of student perceptions relating to large and small marketing subjects

Binney, Wayne, Hall, John and Kennedy, Wendy 2005, What do they think when we stack them in? A comparative analysis of student perceptions relating to large and small marketing subjects, in ANZMAC 2005 : Broadening the boundaries : Proceedings of the 2005 Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy conference, University of Western Australia, School of Business, Perth, W.A., pp. 8-15.

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Title What do they think when we stack them in? A comparative analysis of student perceptions relating to large and small marketing subjects
Author(s) Binney, Wayne
Hall, John
Kennedy, Wendy
Conference name Australian & New Zealand Marketing Academy. Conference (2005 : Fremantle, Western Australia)
Conference location Fremantle, Western Australia
Conference dates 5-7 Dec. 2005
Title of proceedings ANZMAC 2005 : Broadening the boundaries : Proceedings of the 2005 Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy conference
Editor(s) Purchase, Sharon
Publication date 2005
Conference series Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference
Start page 8
End page 15
Total pages 8
Publisher University of Western Australia, School of Business
Place of publication Perth, W.A.
Keyword(s) marketing education
large classes
student satisfaction
teaching quality
Summary University education is in a period of flux with emphasis being focused on quality education, competition for students both local and international as well as changes in governmental financial support and direction. It is with this scenario as a backdrop, that universities in an endeavour to obtain economies of scale offer subjects with large student enrolments. This study investigates marketing students’ perception of and participation in marketing subjects relating to teaching quality, staff availability and support, and individual student involvement in marketing education with large enrolments compared to subjects with small enrolments. This research builds on the investigations of effects of class size by Cuseo (2004) and Binney et al (2004). The study used a multi-method approach. Data from a sample of 621 students was analysed using Factor analysis, MANOVA and ANOVA. Students indicated that there was little difference in the quality of learning obtained in small or large classes. Of interest from a marketing perspective, however, is the perception by students that they are more likely to obtain practical assistance and support from tutors in smaller classes. Student perceptions generally show no major differences between large and small classes in relation to subject selection, ability to learn and lecture  attendance. Students expressed a preference for the opportunity to choose from a number of lecture streams available in subjects with large enrolments. Of interest, however is the student belief that they are less likely to actively participate in large lectures than in small lecture environments.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 0646455028
9780646455020
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2005, ANZMAC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009687

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