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Study of heat flow through a rammed earth wall building

Taylor, P., Fuller, Robert and Luther, Mark 2005, Study of heat flow through a rammed earth wall building, in Proceedings of Earthbuild 2005 : conference, Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway, N.S.W., pp. 109-118.

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Title Study of heat flow through a rammed earth wall building
Author(s) Taylor, P.
Fuller, Robert
Luther, Mark
Conference name Earthbuild (2005 : Sydney, Australia.)
Conference location University of Technology, Sydney, N.S.W.
Conference dates 19-21 Jan. 2005
Title of proceedings Proceedings of Earthbuild 2005 : conference
Editor(s) Heathcote, Kevan
Publication date 2005
Conference series Earthbuild International Conference
Start page 109
End page 118
Publisher Faculty of Design, Architecture and Building, University of Technology, Sydney
Place of publication Broadway, N.S.W.
Summary In 1999, a 2100 m2 (GFA) two-storey rammed earth building was built on the Thurgoona campus of Charles Sturt University. The climate at Thurgoona is considered Mediterranean – hot dry summers and cool winters. The internal and external walls of the building are constructed from 300-mm thick rammed earth (pise) and are load bearing. The thermal performance of the building has been investigated, both experimentally and theoretically over the summer and winter seasons of 2000/1. As part of these investigations heat flux sensors and thermistors were embedded in one of the external walls of a ground floor office, and data from the transducers has been used to determine the heat flow at the internal and external wall surfaces. The simulation software, TRNSYS, has been used to model the thermal performance of the same office. The programme allows the user to calculate the heat flow at the walls, which define any particular thermal zone. A comparison of measured and predicted values of heat flows and air temperatures has been used to validate the model. The model has then been used to simulate the effect of shading and added insulation on the thermal performance of the external walls in both summer and winter and these results are also presented in this paper.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 120202 Building Science and Techniques
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2005, University of Technology, Sydney
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009690

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.