Valuing creativity in technology education

Jane, Beverley and Campbell, Coral 2006, Valuing creativity in technology education, in Values in technology education: Proceedings of the 4th Biennial International Conference on Technology Education Research, Griffith University, Centre for Learning Research, [Nathan,Qld.], pp. 1-11.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Valuing creativity in technology education
Author(s) Jane, Beverley
Campbell, Coral
Conference name International Conference on Technology Education Research (4th : 2006: Gold Coast, Qld.)
Conference location Gold Coast, Queensland
Conference dates 7 - 9 December 2006
Title of proceedings Values in technology education: Proceedings of the 4th Biennial International Conference on Technology Education Research
Editor(s) Roebuck, Dick
Publication date 2006
Conference series International Conference on Technology Education Research
Start page 1
End page 11
Publisher Griffith University, Centre for Learning Research
Place of publication [Nathan,Qld.]
Summary When he was only twelve, Peter Jackson (director of The Lord of the Rings trilogy) cut fur strips from his mother's stole, and using wire he made a 20 cm model of King Kong. After a long incubation period for his ideas, he devised a modem version of the film King Kong. Research shows that the generation of new ideas (generative mental state) cannot exist at the same time as the non-generative/analytical mental state. This research has implications for technology educators who value creativity. We explored how an incubation period of non-focused thinking affected children's creative ideas for their technological products. Five teachers and 117 children from primary schools in a Victorian regional city and a semirural village participated in the study. The teachers factored in an incubation period that allowed time for the children's attention to wander in a relaxed and uncompetitive environment. We analyzed transcripts of teacher interviews and the children's written evaluations and drawings. We found a correlation between the incubation of ideas and the degree of creativity exhibited by the children. This key finding suggests that teachers of technology should take the incubation period into account in order to enhance creativity in the children's technology designs.
Language eng
Field of Research 130306 Educational Technology and Computing
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2006, Griffith Institute for Educational Research
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009788

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Education
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 421 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 14 Oct 2008, 07:02:23 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.