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'Don't be a smart arse': Young workers, individualization, and an ethic of enterprise in Jamie's Kitchen

Kelly, Peter and Harrison, Lyn 2006, 'Don't be a smart arse': Young workers, individualization, and an ethic of enterprise in Jamie's Kitchen, in Sociology for a mobile world: TASA 2006. Proceedings of the annual conference of the Australian Sociological Association, Sociological Association of Australia (TASA), Hawthorn, Vic., pp. 1-11.

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Title 'Don't be a smart arse': Young workers, individualization, and an ethic of enterprise in Jamie's Kitchen
Author(s) Kelly, Peter
Harrison, Lyn
Conference name The Sociological Association of Australia (TASA) Conference (2006: Perth, W.A.)
Conference location Perth, W.A.
Conference dates 4 - 7 December 2006
Title of proceedings Sociology for a mobile world: TASA 2006. Proceedings of the annual conference of the Australian Sociological Association
Editor(s) Colic-Peisker, Val and
Tilbury, Farida
McNamara, Bev
Publication date 2006
Conference series Australian Sociological Association Conference
Start page 1
End page 11
Publisher Sociological Association of Australia (TASA)
Place of publication Hawthorn, Vic.
Summary In Jamie’s Kitchen the high profile celebrity chef Jamie Oliver set out to transform a group of unemployed young Londoners into the enterprising, ideal worker of 21st century flexible capitalism. The paper will argue that this reality TV series provides a means to explore key features of new work regimes. We will analyse particular aspects of the increasingly powerful individualising and normalising processes shaping the lifeworlds of young workers in a globalising risk society. Processes that require those who wish to be positively identified as entrepreneurial to do particular sorts of work on themselves; or suffer the consequences.
Drawing on Foucault’s later work on the care of the self, and the  individualization theses of the reflexive modernization literature, we identify and analyse the forms of personhood that various institutions, organisations and individuals seek to encourage in young workers; and the ways in which institutionalised risk environments increasingly individualise the risks and uncertainties associated with labour market participation. The paper argues that our understandings of what it means to be a worker of the world, are being rearticulated around the idea that we are free to choose. And we must exercise this freedom – reap its rewards, carry its obligations – as individuals.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 1740521390
9781740521390
Language eng
Field of Research 160805 Social Change
1303 Specialist Studies in Education
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2006, TASA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009789

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Education
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