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The life cycle of the AFL footballer : If you sell your body, mind and soul what is left when the cheering stops?

Kelly, Peter and Hickey, Christopher 2006, The life cycle of the AFL footballer : If you sell your body, mind and soul what is left when the cheering stops?, in TASA 2006 : Proceedings of the annual conference of the Australian Sociological Association : Sociology for a mobile world, TASA, Perth, W.A., pp. 1-11.

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Title The life cycle of the AFL footballer : If you sell your body, mind and soul what is left when the cheering stops?
Author(s) Kelly, Peter
Hickey, Christopher
Conference name Annual conference of the Australian Sociological Association (2006 : Perth, Western Australia)
Conference location Perth, Western Australia
Conference dates 4 - 7 December 2006
Title of proceedings TASA 2006 : Proceedings of the annual conference of the Australian Sociological Association : Sociology for a mobile world
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2006
Conference series Australian Sociological Association Conference
Start page 1
End page 11
Publisher TASA
Place of publication Perth, W.A.
Summary In this paper we will draw on research conducted for the AFL which, in part, illuminated aspects of the Faustian pact that many young men enter into in order to become an elite level, professional footballer in what is increasingly a global sports entertainment industry. In order to develop an identity as an AFL footballer these young men willingly sell their body, mind and soul to one club, or to many. For varying lengths of time these pacts can have significant payoffs - in terms of a sense of self, and in monetary terms. For many though, these payoffs are limited and must be accounted for sometime in the future - an accounting that in Faustian terms, can carry significant costs to the body, mind and soul long after the cheering has stopped, and when the benefits come mainly in the form of memories. In this paper we argue that elements of these pacts can be identified and analysed via the following: understanding AFL as a sports entertainment business; using Foucault's work on the care of the self to explore what it means to be an elite level professional and the demands made by others on the body, mind and soul of players; and the idea that a career as an elite level professional footballer has a number of phases (early, mid and late) in which the nature of a professional identity - shaped by different demands on the body, mind and soul- changes.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 9781740521390
1740521390
Language eng
Field of Research 160805 Social Change
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2006, The Author
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009790

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.