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Rugby league: a game in crisis

Summers, Jane, Johnson Morgan, Melissa and Volkov, Michael 2004, Rugby league: a game in crisis, in Where sport marketing theory meets practice: selected papers from the Second Annual Conference of the Sport Marketing Association, Fitness Information Technology, a division of the International Center for Performance Excellence, Morgantown, W. Va., pp. 131-147.

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Title Rugby league: a game in crisis
Author(s) Summers, Jane
Johnson Morgan, Melissa
Volkov, MichaelORCID iD for Volkov, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-2459-4515
Conference name Sport Marketing Association. Conference(2nd: 2004: Memphis, Tenn.)
Conference location Memphis, Tenn.
Conference dates 18-20 November 2004
Title of proceedings Where sport marketing theory meets practice: selected papers from the Second Annual Conference of the Sport Marketing Association
Editor(s) Pitts, Brenda G
Publication date 2004
Start page 131
End page 147
Publisher Fitness Information Technology, a division of the International Center for Performance Excellence
Place of publication Morgantown, W. Va.
Summary This study examines the issue of crisis and reputation management strategies in Australian sporting clubs and finds that not only are individual clubs unaware of the potential impact of such crises on their organizations, but that they also have no training, contingency plans, or strategies to handle crises of any sort either at this or at the national league level. It uses the Australian Rugby League organization as a case study f()r examining these issues and concludes with several recommendations for improving crisis management and communications policies in Australian sporting organizations and for their stakeholders.

Many public and private organizations prefer to ignore the reality that "bad things" can happen, either through denial of their vulnerabilities or through myopia about their successes and strengths (Elliott, 2002). A crisis can be defined as any problem or disruption that triggers negative stakeholder reaction and extensive public scrutiny (Newman, 2003). Effective crisis management lies in continuous learning processes designed to equip managers with the capabilities, flexibility, and confidence to deal with sudden and unexpected problems or events (Robert & Lajtha, 2002). Good crisis leaders are those who can make fast decisions under pressure and who can keep the big picture consequences of actions and words in mind when making these decisions 030in & Lagadec, 20(0). In 2004, the Rugby league in Australia was both ill-prepared and ill-advised to effectively deal with a sex scandal involving a number of their players on an official club tour. In classic crisis escalation, what should have been a serious but easily dealt with problem became a major reputational and institutional crisis for the league, its sponsors, its players, and its fans.
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2004, Fitness Information Technology
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30009794

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.