Immortality and sentencing law

Haigh, Richard and Bagaric, Mirko 2002, Immortality and sentencing law, Journal of philosophy, science & law, vol. 2, pp. 1-4.


Title Immortality and sentencing law
Author(s) Haigh, Richard
Bagaric, Mirko
Journal name Journal of philosophy, science & law
Volume number 2
Start page 1
End page 4
Publisher Georgia State University
Place of publication Atlanta, Ga.
Publication date 2002-05
ISSN 1549-8549
Summary The time may not be far away where we may be able to live much longer than we do now – potentially forever. This will have an enormous impact on the way people live their lives as the underlying premise that life is finite underpins many of the central decisions and life choices we make. This paper outlines some philosophical and legal doctrines that are based on the premise that life is finite and some of the changes that may need to occur in light of medical advances in ageing. In particular, it focuses on the changes to sentencing law that may be necessary to accommodate increased human longevity. For the skeptics who refuse to accept the concept of immortality, the arguments presented do not depend on living forever. Some of the issues discussed here are also relevant, albeit in an attenuated manner, because of increases in human longevity that have occurred in the last 100 years.

Language eng
Field of Research 180110 Criminal Law and Procedure
HERDC Research category C2 Other contribution to refereed journal
Copyright notice ©2002, Journal of Philosophy, Science & Law
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30012724

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Law
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 440 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 21 Oct 2008, 11:22:11 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.