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'Class' and political theatre : the case of Melbourne workers theatre

D'Cruz, Glenn 2005, 'Class' and political theatre : the case of Melbourne workers theatre, New Theatre quarterly, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 207-217, doi: 10.1017/S0266464X05000114.

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Title 'Class' and political theatre : the case of Melbourne workers theatre
Author(s) D'Cruz, GlennORCID iD for D'Cruz, Glenn orcid.org/0000-0002-6438-1725
Journal name New Theatre quarterly
Volume number 21
Issue number 3
Start page 207
End page 217
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2005-08
ISSN 0266-464X
1474-0613
Summary Traditionally, class has been an important category of identity in discussions of political theatre. However, in recent years the concept has fallen out of favour, partly because of changes in the forces and relations of capitalist production. The conventional Marxist use of the term, which defined an individual's class position in relation to the position they occupied in the capitalist production process, seemed anachronistic in an era of globalization. Moreover, the rise of identity politics, queer theory, feminism, and post-colonialism have proffered alternative categories of identity that have displaced class as the primary marker of self. Glenn D'Cruz reconsiders the role of class in the cultural life of Australia by examining the recent work of Melbourne Workers Theatre, a theatre company devoted to promoting class-consciousness, in relation to John Frow's more recent re-conceptualization of class. He looks specifically at two of the company's plays, the award-winning Who's Afraid of the Working Class? and The Waiting Room, with reference to Frow's work on class, arguing that these productions articulate a more complex and sophisticated understanding of class and its relation to politics of race and gender today.
Language eng
DOI 10.1017/S0266464X05000114
Field of Research 190499 Performing Arts and Creative Writing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970119 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of the Creative Arts and Writing
HERDC Research category C2 Other contribution to refereed journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Cambridge University Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30013193

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.