You are not logged in.

Overweight and obesity from childhood to adulthood: a follow-up of participants in the 1985 Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey

Venn, Alison, Thomson, Russell, Schmidt, Michael, Cleland, Verity, Curry, Beverley, Gennat, Hanni and Dwyer, Terence 2007, Overweight and obesity from childhood to adulthood: a follow-up of participants in the 1985 Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey, Medical journal of Australia, vol. 186, no. 9, pp. 458-460.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Overweight and obesity from childhood to adulthood: a follow-up of participants in the 1985 Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey
Author(s) Venn, Alison
Thomson, Russell
Schmidt, Michael
Cleland, Verity
Curry, Beverley
Gennat, Hanni
Dwyer, Terence
Journal name Medical journal of Australia
Volume number 186
Issue number 9
Start page 458
End page 460
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Company Pty Ltd
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Publication date 2007-05
ISSN 0025-729X
Summary Objective: To examine overweight and obesity in Australian children followed through to adulthood.

Design and participants
: A cohort study of 8498 children aged 7–15 years who participated in the 1985 Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey; of these, 2208 men and 2363 women completed a follow-up questionnaire at age 24–34 years in 2001–2005.

Main outcome measures: Height and weight were measured in 1985, and self-reported at follow-up. The accuracy of self-reported data was checked in 1185 participants. Overweight and obesity in childhood were defined according to international standard definitions for body mass index (BMI), and, in adulthood, as a BMI of 25–29.9 and ≥ 30 kg/m2, respectively, after correcting for self-report error.

Results: In those with baseline and follow-up data, the prevalence of overweight and obesity in childhood was 8.3% and 1.5% in boys and 9.7% and 1.4% in girls, respectively. At follow-up, the prevalence was 40.1% and 13.0% in men and 19.7% and 11.7% in women. The relative risk (RR) of becoming an obese adult was significantly greater for those who had been obese as children compared with those who had been a healthy weight (RR = 4.7; 95% CI, 3.0–7.2 for boys and RR = 9.2; 95% CI, 6.9–12.3 for girls). The proportion of adult obesity attributable to childhood obesity was 6.4% in males and 12.6% in females.

Conclusion: Obesity in childhood was strongly predictive of obesity in early adulthood, but most obese young adults were a healthy weight as children.

Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30013521

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 123 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 134 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 440 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 21 Oct 2008, 11:28:07 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.