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EBanking adaptation and dot.com viability : a comparison of Australian and Indian experiences in the banking sector

Unnithan, Chandana and Swatman, Paula M.C. 2001, EBanking adaptation and dot.com viability : a comparison of Australian and Indian experiences in the banking sector, in Proceedings of the 11th Annual BIT Conference 2001, Manchester Metropolitan University Business School, Manchester, England, pp. 1-15.

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Title EBanking adaptation and dot.com viability : a comparison of Australian and Indian experiences in the banking sector
Author(s) Unnithan, Chandana
Swatman, Paula M.C.
Conference name BIT Conference (11th : 2001 : Manchester, England)
Conference location Manchester, England
Conference dates 30-31 Oct. 2001
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the 11th Annual BIT Conference 2001
Publication date 2001
Start page 1
End page 15
Publisher Manchester Metropolitan University Business School
Place of publication Manchester, England
Summary With the advent of widely-accepted eBusiness activities, many banks have floated dot.com entities to create a presence on the Internet and take advantage of its power and reach. Like many other businesses, banks expected an increase in market capitalisation as a result of their dot.com floats, perceived broadly as a measure of growing profitability. Despite the negative publicity that the recent spate of dot.com crashes has generated, banks seem to continue floating online spin-offs. Our exploratory study investigates this phenomenon, studying the drivers for change in the evolution of the banking sector, and the move towards electronic banking. We focussed on two economies – Australia and India – to aggregate the major factors in this evolution from the perspective of two disparate economies.

The paper describes our qualitative, document-based investigation of the Australian and Indian banking sectors, and subsequent quantitative analysis of the impact of dot.com floats on market capitalisation within this market sector. We then describe the effect of applying both Transaction Cost Economics to our findings, which indicates that the cost of transacting business has been reduced overall by the creation of dot.com entities; and “catch-up, fall-behind, forge ahead” theory to gain an economic perspective. The paper provides both practical assistance for banks in making decisions regarding e-portfolios, as well as for policy makers in the economies reviewed; and has the potential to contribute to academic research into eBanking more generally.
Notes
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Language eng
Field of Research 150399 Business and Management not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Copyright notice ©2001, Manchester Metropolitan University
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30013661

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Information and Business Analytics
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.