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'Research as dialogue' and cross cultural consultations : confronting relations of power

Sanderson, Von and Allard, Andrea 2001, 'Research as dialogue' and cross cultural consultations : confronting relations of power, in AARE 2001 : Crossing borders : New frontiers in educational research : Australian Association for Research in Education conference proceedings, Australian Association for Research in Education, Coldstream, Vic., pp. 1-4.

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Title 'Research as dialogue' and cross cultural consultations : confronting relations of power
Author(s) Sanderson, Von
Allard, Andrea
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2001 : Fremantle, W.A.)
Conference location Fremantle, W.A.
Conference dates 2-6 December 2001
Title of proceedings AARE 2001 : Crossing borders : New frontiers in educational research : Australian Association for Research in Education conference proceedings
Editor(s) Shilton, W.
Jeffrey, R.
Publication date 2001
Start page 1
End page 4
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Coldstream, Vic.
Summary The 'rescuing' of Indigenous children (from their communities) through education, and the notions of assimilation associated with that, is an aspect of colonialism that has persisted into the so-called 'post-colonial' era. Recent national policy statements (eg. MCEETYA, 2000; NBEET, 1995) argue the importance of education/research that keeps the locus of control within the Aboriginal community as a means to further the goal of self determination and improve educational outcomes. In this paper, we report on the initial stage of a small empirical research project, Engaging Aboriginal Students In Education Through Community Empowerment.

'Research as dialogue' was a guiding principal and a primary aim was to listen actively to all key stake holders in the remote community setting, particularly to Indigenous parents, teachers and service providers, in order to identify current

strengths and concerns regarding the provision of culturally inclusive schooling; and then, to develop, on the basis of these consultations and in collaboration, community-based education projects that engage non-attending Aboriginal students.

In this paper, we critically analyse the difficulties as well as potential strengths of trying to form collaborative partnerships as researchers, across cultural differences and with diverse community groups. For example, what does 'acknowledging' very different cultural perspectives actually mean to/in this kind of research process? The ways in which relations of power amongst all parties are played out in/through such an approach is also opened up for scrutiny and further discussion.

Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISSN 1324-9339
Language eng
Field of Research 130399 Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category L2 Full written paper - non-refereed (minor conferences)
Copyright notice ©2001, Sanderson and Allard
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30013706

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.