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Pathway planning and 'becoming somebody' : Exploring the tensions between wellbeing and credentialism with students at (educational) risk

Angwin, Jennifer, Blackmore, Jill, Harrison, Lyn and Shacklock, Geoffrey 2001, Pathway planning and 'becoming somebody' : Exploring the tensions between wellbeing and credentialism with students at (educational) risk, in AARE 2001 : Crossing borders : New frontiers in educational research : Australian Association for Research in Education conference proceedings, Australian Association for Research in Education, Coldstream, Vic..

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Title Pathway planning and 'becoming somebody' : Exploring the tensions between wellbeing and credentialism with students at (educational) risk
Author(s) Angwin, Jennifer
Blackmore, Jill
Harrison, Lyn
Shacklock, Geoffrey
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2001 : Fremantle, W.A.)
Conference location Fremantle, W.A.
Conference dates 2–6 Dec. 2001
Title of proceedings AARE 2001 : Crossing borders : New frontiers in educational research : Australian Association for Research in Education conference proceedings
Editor(s) Shilton, W.
Jeffrey, R.
Publication date 2001
Conference series Australian Association for Research in Education Conference
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Coldstream, Vic.
Summary This paper maps the policy shifts around the education and training of youth that frame how schools respond to issues of youth' at risk'. These shifts have occurred with the move from the self managing schools marked by market discourses of competition, autonomy and image management that supplanted earlier discourses of welfare and community, through to recent policies in Victoria arising from the Kirby Review of Post compulsory Education and Public Education, the Next Generation undertaken by the Labor government. These reports, and the policies emerging out of them, are producing new discourses about youth and schooling focusing on wellbeing, learning networks and more systemic support for schools at the same time as there is increased accountability and expectations of schools. Drawing on the school exclusion literature from the U.K, and using Bourdieu's notion of habitus, we examine the findings from a recent study undertaken on the Geelong Pathways Planning project, funded through a Victorian government strategy, to discuss how schools respond to such initiatives. The project explored the ways in which students in the Geelong region understood and worked with the job planning pathways program, and how service providers (schools, community education facilities, job networks etc) coordinated to meet the needs of individual youth. There was a disjuncture in the participating schools between the discourses of care and welfare for students at risk, and the actual practices and policies that ignored or excluded such students. This paper concludes with a discussion of what might be required systemically, in schools and in their relations to other education providers, to build the capacity to respond more effectively to all students.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISSN 1324-9339
Language eng
Field of Research 130399 Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2001, AARE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30013727

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Social and Cultural Studies in Education
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