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Surviving suppression : no detectable impacts of Class A foam on soil invertebrates and some Australian native plants

Adams, Robyn, Simmons, Dianne, Hartskeerl, K. and Koehler, M. 2004, Surviving suppression : no detectable impacts of Class A foam on soil invertebrates and some Australian native plants, in Bushfire 2004 : earth, wind & fire : fusing the elements : conference proceedings, Department for Environment and Heritage, South Australia, [Adelaide, South Australia].

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Title Surviving suppression : no detectable impacts of Class A foam on soil invertebrates and some Australian native plants
Author(s) Adams, Robyn
Simmons, Dianne
Hartskeerl, K.
Koehler, M.
Conference name Bushfire Conference (2004 : Adelaide, South Australia)
Conference location Adelaide, S. Aust.
Conference dates May 25-28 2004
Title of proceedings Bushfire 2004 : earth, wind & fire : fusing the elements : conference proceedings
Publication date 2004
Publisher Department for Environment and Heritage, South Australia
Place of publication [Adelaide, South Australia]
Keyword(s) ecological impacts
Class A foam
native plant species
soil invertebrates
minimum impact suppression tactics
Summary Firefighting foams (Class A foams) are an effective and widespread firefighting tool which are frequently used in environmentally sensitive areas. Firefighting foams are known to be ecologically damaging in aquatic environments, however their impacts at the plant species or ecosystem level are relatively unknown. Reports of shoot damage to plants, suppressed flowering, and changes in plant community composition suggested that the ecological damage caused by their use may be unacceptable. However, applications of foam to seedlings of some Australian plant species from representative and widespread families, showed no detectable impacts on a range of vegetative growth characteristics. Application of 1.0% foam to heathland soils showed no detectable impacts on soil invertebrate Orders sampled over several months. The results are encouraging for the continued use of Class A foam as a fire suppression technique.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Proceedings available from http://science.dec.wa.gov.au/conslib.php?id=918149&type=all
Language eng
Field of Research 060208 Terrestrial Ecology
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014105

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Ecology and Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.