An evaluation framework for the qualitative investigation of a physical activity prescription program in rural Victoria

Sager, Richard, MacDougall, Colin and Dunbar, James 2004, An evaluation framework for the qualitative investigation of a physical activity prescription program in rural Victoria, in GP & PHC 2004 : General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference : Proceedings, Primary Health Care Research and Information Service, [Brisbane, Qld.], pp. 3-3.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title An evaluation framework for the qualitative investigation of a physical activity prescription program in rural Victoria
Author(s) Sager, Richard
MacDougall, Colin
Dunbar, James
Conference name General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference (2004 : Brisbane, Qld.)
Conference location Brisbane, Qld.
Conference dates 2-4 Jun. 2004
Title of proceedings GP & PHC 2004 : General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference : Proceedings
Publication date 2004
Start page 3
End page 3
Publisher Primary Health Care Research and Information Service
Place of publication [Brisbane, Qld.]
Summary Physical activity (PA) has consistently been shown to improve ones' physical, social and mental health. Hence, the rationale for promoting regular physical activity is relatively straightforward. However, what is less clear from the literature is the mix of strategies, (i.e. 'what is working and why?'), to increase in physical activity levels within a population. Of particular interest to primary care is the concept of Physical Activity Prescription Programs (PAPPs) delivered by general practitioners (GPs).

Several examples of a PAPP exist within England, America, New Zealand and Australia. These all aim to encourage GPs to deliver physical activity advice to their patients effectively and in a timely manner. Notwithstanding, the authors of a recent review of published literature on PAPPs, reveal a deficit of evidence regarding the components for successful PA interventions.

This research through an ethnographic enquiry aims to build on the evidence formulated to date. Through a case study research design, the researcher has developed a methodology to define what is/is not working within this recent trend.

In two rural Divisions of GP, participants have been identified as key stakeholders in the implementation of a PAPPs. They are categorised according to three theoretical paradigms, namely, Policy Makers, Linkers and Adaptors. Following this the three paradigms will be studied on the contextual factors, the characteristics and behaviours of members within all three paradigms. The study has also further defined certain elements for investigation, these include the:
intention of the players
effort undertaken by players, and
effect of parties within.

Primarily qualitative data will be collected; through Desk Analysis (Policies, Strategic and Business plans), Site Visits (Participant Observation) and semi-structured interviews. This presentation defines a qualitative framework and methodology for investigating the outcome of programs that historically has been evaluated using quantitative measures. Hence, the author of this study aims to present a qualitative investigation and subsequent results, defining aspects of a PAPP that allow for successful and sustainable implementation.
Language eng
Field of Research 111717 Primary Health Care
Socio Economic Objective 920506 Rural Health
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2004, Primary Healthcare Research and Information Service
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014195

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 336 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 21 Oct 2008, 14:19:47 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.