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Studies on physiologic specialisation of albugo candida causing white blister on broccoli in Victoria

Petkowski, J., Minchinton, E., Faggian, R. and Cahill, D. 2004, Studies on physiologic specialisation of albugo candida causing white blister on broccoli in Victoria, in ComBio2004 : Abstracts of Papers Presented at the ComBio2004 Conference, Australian Socity for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, [Perth, W.A.], pp. 143-143.

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Title Studies on physiologic specialisation of albugo candida causing white blister on broccoli in Victoria
Author(s) Petkowski, J.
Minchinton, E.
Faggian, R.
Cahill, D.
Conference name ComBio2004 Conference (2004 : Perth, W.A.)
Conference location Perth, W.A.
Conference dates 29-30 Sep. 2004
Title of proceedings ComBio2004 : Abstracts of Papers Presented at the ComBio2004 Conference
Publication date 2004
Start page 143
End page 143
Publisher Australian Socity for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Place of publication [Perth, W.A.]
Summary White blister caused by oomycete Albugo candida (Pers. Ex. Lev.) Kuntze, (AC), is an important disease affecting many cruciferous hosts, including vegetable brassicas. The outbreaks of white blister in broccoli and cauliflower crops (Brassica oleracea var. italica and var. botrytis) in Southern Australia in the last three years led to restrictions on movement of fresh produce and seedlings from the disease-affected areas. Current classification of AC races is based on physiologic specialisation of this pathogen. Race 9 has been identified to cause white blister on B. oleracea in the USA. We report on specialisation of AC causing disease in Victorian broccoli crops and the use of molecular tools for the separation of AC races. In a glasshouse, 12 Brassicaceae species/varieties replicated 6 times, were inoculated twice at the fully developed cotyledon stage with a distilled water suspension of zoosporangia (1x104 per ml) collected from a single broccoli leaf. Two weeks after inoculation the incidence of white blister on cotyledons and seedling leaves of cauliflower, broccoli, black mustard and Indian mustard was 79.7, 78.4, 73.7 and 6.9% respectively. Cabbage plants were symptomless indicating that further specialisation of the pathogen may have occurred in Australia. High disease incidence among black mustard plants shows that the Australian isolate differs from overseas AC race 9. The interaction of a number of B. oleracea varieties to a range of AC isolates from various hosts will be investigated. Degenerate primers are now being used to amplify actin and β-tubulin genes to identify race specific polymorphisms in AC isolates from three different hosts (wild radish, Chinese cabbage, and broccoli). Differing PCR amplification efficiencies from broccoli and wild radish isolates using degenerate actin primers indicates sequence differences in the two isolates. The fragments are now being cloned and sequenced for race comparison.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISBN 1328-4924
Language eng
Field of Research 070603 Horticultural Crop Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)
Socio Economic Objective 960413 Control of Plant Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Farmland, Arable Cropland and Permanent Cropland
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2004, Australian Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014225

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
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