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Investigation of plasmodiophora brassicae (clubroot disease) in vegetable brassica using arabidopsis thaliana as a model system

Agarwal, A., Kaul, V., Faggian, R. and Cahill, D. 2004, Investigation of plasmodiophora brassicae (clubroot disease) in vegetable brassica using arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, in ComBio2004 : Abstracts of Papers Presented at the ComBio2004 Conference, Australian Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, [Perth, W.A.], pp. 142-142.

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Title Investigation of plasmodiophora brassicae (clubroot disease) in vegetable brassica using arabidopsis thaliana as a model system
Author(s) Agarwal, A.
Kaul, V.
Faggian, R.
Cahill, D.
Conference name ComBio2004 Conference (2004 : Perth, W.A.)
Conference location Perth, W.A.
Conference dates 29-30 Sep. 2004
Title of proceedings ComBio2004 : Abstracts of Papers Presented at the ComBio2004 Conference
Publication date 2004
Start page 142
End page 142
Publisher Australian Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Place of publication [Perth, W.A.]
Summary Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is the most devastating soil-borne disease of vegetable brassicas. It occurs all over the world and is responsible for crop losses of up to 10% every year. In Australia, the disease is being managed effectively with chemicals and cultural practices, but ideally control can be improved in the long term by the introduction of resistant cultivars. The life cycle ofP. brassicae and mode of action of plant resistance has not been fully elucidated because of the technical difficulties of working with an obligate, soil-borne plant pathogen. However, Arabidopsis thaliana, which is a host ofP. brassicae, has great potential as a model system for studying the life cycle, the infection process and development of resistance. We have developed a sand-liquid-culture system for growing Arabidopsis that allows easy observation of all life stages and, most importantly, the primary plasmodial stages within the root hair. The method was first optimised for observations of the lifecycle of the pathogen in a susceptible Arabidopsis ecotype (Col-3) where all stages of the lifecycle have now been observed and characterised. Further screening of Arabidopsis ecotypes for disease resistance has utilised one of the most virulent Australian pathotypes of brassica (ECD number 16/19/31). To date, Arabidopsis ecotype Ta-0 has shown a level of tolerance to the disease even though the roots get infected. It has been reported earlier that resistance toP. brassicae in Arabidopsis is due to one or a small number of genes. To examine changes in gene expression during the early, critical stages of infection, RNA was extracted from the susceptible and resistant ecotypes at two time points, 4 days and 17 days after inoculation. Microarray analysis will be used to investigate genome wide changes in gene expression during infection but also to identify candidate genes that may confer resistance to Australian isolates of the pathogen.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
ISSN 1328-4924
Language eng
Field of Research 070603 Horticultural Crop Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)
Socio Economic Objective 960413 Control of Plant Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Farmland, Arable Cropland and Permanent Cropland
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2004, Australian Socity for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014226

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
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