The key learning area movement : A force for pedagogical change or a facade for continued conservatism?

Harris, Catherine 2004, The key learning area movement : A force for pedagogical change or a facade for continued conservatism?, in AARE 2004 : Doing the public good : positioning educational research ; AARE 2004 International Education Research conference proceedings, Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-11.

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Title The key learning area movement : A force for pedagogical change or a facade for continued conservatism?
Formatted title Key learning area movement : A force for pedagogical change or a façade for continued conservatism?
Author(s) Harris, Catherine
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2004 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 28 November - 2 December 2004
Title of proceedings AARE 2004 : Doing the public good : positioning educational research ; AARE 2004 International Education Research conference proceedings
Editor(s) Jeffery, Peter L.
Publication date 2004
Start page 1
End page 11
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary Throughout the early 1990s the formal curriculum across all Australian States and Territories was re-organised to accommodate a Key Learning Area (KLA) focus.  The KLA approach to schooling marked a departure from an historical reliance on individualised school subjects as the organisers of disciplinary knowledge.  Indeed a KLA structure has the potential to promote interdisciplinary teaching and learning, a focus on the skills, values, attitudes and knowledge students are to learn and to break away from the sometimes divisive subject subcultures that permiate schools.  In short the potential for a KLA 'movement' of positive benefit to teaching and learning exists.

Over the last decade however, the impact of the 'KLA movement' on teacher practice has become more apparent.  Far from being a force for pedagogical change, some KLAs are merely re-badged versions of traditionalist conceptions of school subject and knowledge.  This paper draws on data from a study of New South Wales (NSW) history and Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE) teachers and provides an evidenced argument about the use and misuse of Key Learning Areas.
ISSN 1324-9339
Language eng
Field of Research 130399 Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
HERDC collection year 2005
Copyright notice ©2004, AARE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014352

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Scientific and Developmental Studies in Education
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