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Using activity theory in researching young children's use of calculators

Groves, Susie and Dale, Joyce 2004, Using activity theory in researching young children's use of calculators, in AARE 2004 : Doing the public good : positioning educational research ; AARE 2004 International Education Research conference proceedings, Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-11.

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Title Using activity theory in researching young children's use of calculators
Author(s) Groves, Susie
Dale, Joyce
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2004 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Victoria
Conference dates 28 November - 2 December 2004
Title of proceedings AARE 2004 : Doing the public good : positioning educational research ; AARE 2004 International Education Research conference proceedings
Editor(s) Jeffery, Peter L.
Publication date 2004
Start page 1
End page 11
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary Constructivist and socio-cultural perspectives in mathematics education highlight the crucial role that activity plays in mathematical development and learning. Activity theory provides a socio-cultural lens to help analyse human behaviour, including that which occurs in classrooms. It provides a framework for co-ordinating constructivist and socio-cultural perspectives in mathematics learning. In this paper, we adopt Cole and Engeström's (1991) model of activity theory to examine the mediation offered by the calculator as a tool for creating and supporting learning processes of young children in the social environment of their classroom. By adopting this framework, data on young children's learning outcomes in number, when given free access to calculators, can be examined not only in terms of the mediating role of the calculator, but also within the broader context of the classroom community, the teachers' beliefs and intentions, and the classroom norms and the division of labour. Use of this model in a post hoc situation suggests that activity theory can play a significant role in the planning of future classroom research.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISSN 1324-9339
Language eng
Field of Research 130208 Mathematics and Numeracy Curriculum and Pedagogy
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
HERDC collection year 2005
Copyright notice ©2004, AARE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014353

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