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Carboniferous brachiopods from the "Levipustula Fauna" in central-western Argentina : biostratigraphic, palaeoclimatic, and palaeobiogeographic implications

Cisterna, Gabriela and Archbold, Neil 2005, Carboniferous brachiopods from the "Levipustula Fauna" in central-western Argentina : biostratigraphic, palaeoclimatic, and palaeobiogeographic implications, in Fifth international brachiopod congress : Copenhagen 2005 : abstracts, International Brachiopod Congress, [Copenhagen, Denmark], pp. 36-37.

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Title Carboniferous brachiopods from the "Levipustula Fauna" in central-western Argentina : biostratigraphic, palaeoclimatic, and palaeobiogeographic implications
Author(s) Cisterna, Gabriela
Archbold, Neil
Conference name International Brachiopod Congress (5th : 2005 : Copenhagen, Denmark)
Conference location Copenhagen, Denmark
Conference dates 5-7 Jul. 2005
Title of proceedings Fifth international brachiopod congress : Copenhagen 2005 : abstracts
Editor(s) Harper, David A.T.
Long, Sarah L.
McCorry, Maureen
Publication date 2005
Start page 36
End page 37
Publisher International Brachiopod Congress
Place of publication [Copenhagen, Denmark]
Summary The “Levipustula fauna” is a relatively diverse fossil assemblage composed of brachiopods, bivalves, bryozoans, gastropods and crinoids that appears in glaciomarine sequences related to the Carboniferous glacial event that affected the central-western Argentinean basins. Brachiopods that characterize this fauna have been studied in some of the classical localities of the Argentine Precordillera in San Juan province.

In the Hoyada Verde Formation, the “Levipustula fauna” is usually located immediately above the glacial diamictite horizons and appears to be associated with the mudstones facies of the postglacial transgression. From a palaeoecological study, three brachiopod subfaunas are distinguished in this formation: the lower “Neospirifer” (“Trigonotretidae” gen. nov.) subfauna, above which the more diversified Kitakamithyris subfauna occurs, and the upper Levipustula subfauna, with the dominant species being attributed to Levipustula levis Maxwell. The Hoyada Verde fauna, as well those identified in the La Capilla Formation (Cerro El Morado locality), have been proposed as the typical “Levipustula fauna”. However, in the Leoncito Formation, the “Levipustula fauna” occurs in sandstones horizons located below the glacial diamictite beds. This fauna is poorly diversified and the brachiopods are characterized by “Neospirifer” (“Trigonotretidae” gen. nov.)-Septosyringothyris assemblage and Levipustula is not abundant. This fauna has been considered a colder “pre-interglacial fauna”.

The significant taxonomic, palaeoecologic and taphonomic variations of the “Levipustula fauna”, as well as its position in the glacial sequences, suggest an important palaeoenvironmental control related to Carboniferous glacial dynamics. From the palaeobiogeographic viewpoint, this fauna shows the highest affinity with the Eastern Australian basins from where it was previously described.
ISBN 8788114252
Language eng
Field of Research 040308 Palaeontology (incl Palynology)
Socio Economic Objective 970104 Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014493

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Ecology and Environment
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