You are not logged in.

Permian Chonetoidea and Spiriferoidea of Australasia : Gondwanan relationships, provincialism, palaeobiogeography

Archbold, N.W. 2005, Permian Chonetoidea and Spiriferoidea of Australasia : Gondwanan relationships, provincialism, palaeobiogeography, in Proceedings of the Fifth International Brachiopod Congress, Wiley-Blackwell, [Copenhagen, Denmark], pp. 5-6.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Permian Chonetoidea and Spiriferoidea of Australasia : Gondwanan relationships, provincialism, palaeobiogeography
Author(s) Archbold, N.W.
Conference name International Brachiopod Congress (5th : 2005 : Copenhagen, Denmark)
Conference location Copenhagen, Denmark
Conference dates 5-7 Jul. 2005
Title of proceedings Proceedings of the Fifth International Brachiopod Congress
Editor(s) Harper, David A.T.
Long, Sarah L.
McCorry, Maureen
Publication date 2005
Start page 5
End page 6
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication [Copenhagen, Denmark]
Summary Members of the Spiriferoidea are dominant in the Permian marine invertebrate faunas of Australia. Genera can be endemic to a particular province, demonstrate a wider Gondwanan and peri-Gondwanan distribution and several indicate a bipolar distribution. Australasian spiriferoids are included within the families Spiriferidae, Neospiriferidae, Trigonotretidae and the Spiriferellidae. Several genera and species are the largest spirferoids ever recorded. Few genera are shared between the Westralian and Austrazean provinces but a higher proportion of genera are shared between the Westralian province and the Cimmerian Realm.
Representatives of the Chonetoidea are a less common but significant element of the faunas. They were used over 20 years ago to define the Westralian and Austrazean provinces of Australasia – concepts that are in widespread use today. The Paratinan and Cimmerian provinces were also defined at that time despite difficulties in their definition. Through more recent studies the Cimmerian Province has been upgraded to a Realm while the Paratinan Province is more clearly defined for the earliest Permian, based on the chonetoids of Patagonia and western and eastern central Argentina.
Distribution of the various genera is best explained by an interplay of factors including surface and deeper oceanic currents, marine water temperatures and tectonic events such as the clockwise rotation of Gondwanan and the dispersal of the peri-Gondwanan Cimmerian terranes. Austrazean faunas developed in isolation under the influence of cooler and cold waters during the early Permian. Late Permian faunas demonstrated more widespread linkages.
ISBN 9781405186643
140518664X
Language eng
Field of Research 040308 Palaeontology (incl Palynology)
Socio Economic Objective 970104 Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2005, Wiley-Blackwell
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014494

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Ecology and Environment
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 297 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 21 Oct 2008, 14:23:27 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.