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Effects of high-intensity progressive resistance training on self-reported health status in older persons with type 2 diabetes

Dunstan, David, Daly, Robin, Owen, Neville, Shaw, Jonathan, Jolley, Damien, Vulikh, Elena and Zimmet, Paul 2005, Effects of high-intensity progressive resistance training on self-reported health status in older persons with type 2 diabetes, in Fourth annual conference of the international society of behavioral nutrition and physical activity (ISBNPA) : programs and abstracts, International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, The Netherlands, pp. 82-82.

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Title Effects of high-intensity progressive resistance training on self-reported health status in older persons with type 2 diabetes
Author(s) Dunstan, David
Daly, Robin
Owen, Neville
Shaw, Jonathan
Jolley, Damien
Vulikh, Elena
Zimmet, Paul
Conference name International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (4th : 2005 : Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Conference location Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Conference dates 16-18 Jun. 2005
Title of proceedings Fourth annual conference of the international society of behavioral nutrition and physical activity (ISBNPA) : programs and abstracts
Publication date 2005
Start page 82
End page 82
Publisher International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Place of publication The Netherlands
Summary Purpose: To evaluate the influence of high-intensity progressive resistance training (PRT) on self-reported physical and mental health in older persons with type 2 diabetes.

Methods: We performed a 12-month RCT with 36 overweight men and women with type 2 diabetes (aged 60-80 years) who were randomly assigned to a moderate weight-loss diet plus PRT (PRT&WL) or a moderate weight-loss diet plus a control (stretching) program (WL). Gymnasium-based training for 6 months was followed by an additional 6 months of home-based training. The SF-36 (v1) questionnaire was used to obtain physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) health component summary scores at baseline, 6 and 12 months.

Results: Subject retention was 81% and 72% after 6 and 12 months respectively. Exercise adherence during gymnasium- and home-based training was 88% and 73% for the PRT&WL group, and 85% and 78.1% for the WL group respectively. In a regression model adjusted for age and sex, PCS improved in the PRT&WL group compared to the WL group after 6 months of gymnasium-based training (2.3 versus -2.0, p = 0.05), which persisted after 12 months training (0.7 versus -4.1, p = 0.03). There were no between-group differences at 6 or 12 months for the MCS.

Conclusion: High-intensity PRT was effective in improving self-reported physical health, but not mental health. PRT provides an effective exercise alternative in lifestyle management for older adults with type 2 diabetes.
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Language eng
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2005, International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014571

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.