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Functional status after bloodstream infection : the survivors' trajectory

Gardner, Anne 2006, Functional status after bloodstream infection : the survivors' trajectory, in AICA 2006 : Abstracts : Australian Infection Control Association Fourth Biennial National Conference : The Key to Success, Australian Infection Control Association, Neutral Bay, N.S.W., pp. 147-147, doi: 10.1071/HI06140.

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Title Functional status after bloodstream infection : the survivors' trajectory
Author(s) Gardner, Anne
Conference name Australian Infection Control Association National Conference (4th : 2006 : Sydney, N.S.W.)
Conference location Sydney, N.S.W.
Conference dates 20-22 Sep. 2006
Title of proceedings AICA 2006 : Abstracts : Australian Infection Control Association Fourth Biennial National Conference : The Key to Success
Publication date 2006
Start page 147
End page 147
Publisher Australian Infection Control Association
Place of publication Neutral Bay, N.S.W.
Summary There is very little information about the quality of survival for patients after bacterial and fungal bloodstream infections. This study aimed to describe the functional status and level of activities of daily living for a group of survivors of these infections. A prospective exploratory design was used to track adults for 6 months after onset of infection. Survivors were assessed for reduced or full health status. Telephone interviews, using the London Handicap Scale and the Sickness Impact Profile, provided self-assessed functional status for those able to participate; 165 adults were tracked. Before infection, only 25% of adults had an active malignancy and one-tenth required a high level of assistance with activities of daily living. Six months after infection, half of survivors had reduced health and many had not returned to their normal functional activity level. There was considerable continued reduced health in survivors, demonstrating that not only do bloodstream infections result in high short-term mortality but also in considerable longer term morbidity and profound alteration in functional health status for many survivors.
Notes Extract has been published in : Australian Infection Control Volume 11 Number 4 2006 p.147.
ISSN 1329-9360
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/HI06140
Field of Research 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2006, Australian Infection Control Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014703

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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