Procedural trained, procedural remain : the first report from 'A census of doctors who have been awarded the Graduate Diploma in Rural General Practice (GDRGP)'

Loy, C. and Dunbar, J. 2006, Procedural trained, procedural remain : the first report from 'A census of doctors who have been awarded the Graduate Diploma in Rural General Practice (GDRGP)', in GP & PHC 2006 : Optimising Impact : 2006 General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference Abstracts, Primary Health Care Research and Information Service, [Perth, W.A.].


Title Procedural trained, procedural remain : the first report from 'A census of doctors who have been awarded the Graduate Diploma in Rural General Practice (GDRGP)'
Author(s) Loy, C.
Dunbar, J.
Conference name General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference (2006 : Perth, W.A.)
Conference location Perth, W.A.
Conference dates 5-7 Jul. 2006
Title of proceedings GP & PHC 2006 : Optimising Impact : 2006 General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference Abstracts
Publication date 2006
Publisher Primary Health Care Research and Information Service
Place of publication [Perth, W.A.]
Summary Aims & rationale/Objectives : To document the practice of initial cohorts receiving the Graduate Diploma in Rural General Practice
Methods : With the co-operation of the National Rural Faculty (NRF) of Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP), a census by questionnaire was conducted on 279 graduates. The response rate was 70%.
Principal findings : The target doctors are young (65% < 40 years old). Under half (42.3%) have completed Advanced Rural Skills terms in >1 discipline. Of the total 272 posts recorded from 174 respondents, the most popular advanced skill is anaesthetics, followed by obstetrics. The ARSP increased confidence in 96.3% of respondents. Two thirds of doctors trained in a procedural skill remain practicing procedural General Practice.
Discussion : The GDRGP was the qualification developed to recognise competency gained as a result of a series of rural training initiatives begun within the RACGP Training Program in 1992. Its delivery has continued under the new GPET Training Program. Outcomes from the range of initiatives leading to the GDRGP are currently emerging in an environment which has seen significant changes within vocational training, and within the context of a rising focus on indemnity. Doctors who undertook this training have mostly retained procedural practice. In addition, RACGP rural initiatives successfully achieved increase confidence prior to rural work in advanced areas of practice, with >95% reporting an increase.
Implications : Changes within vocational training were accelerated without analysis of existing initiatives such as the GDRGP. Funding for the GDRGP was, as a result, withdrawn prematurely. These changes also saw the entrant of a second College with an interest in rural procedural practice. This research show that the GDRGP offers, and offered, a clear vocational pathway that will guide a doctor to a career as a rural doctor, and provide them with the advanced skills they need to practice confidently in the bush. It is important to capitalise on past success before deconstructing professional concepts of practice further.
Presentation type : Paper
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014757

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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