The need for best practice standards in electronic governance of patient medical records to faccilitate innovation

Walsh, Craig, McNamara, Kevin and Schoo, Adrian 2006, The need for best practice standards in electronic governance of patient medical records to faccilitate innovation, in GP & PHC 2006 : Optimising Impact : 2006 General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference Abstracts, Primary Health Care Research and Information Service, [Perth, W.A.].

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title The need for best practice standards in electronic governance of patient medical records to faccilitate innovation
Author(s) Walsh, Craig
McNamara, Kevin
Schoo, Adrian
Conference name General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference (2006 : Perth, W.A.)
Conference location Perth, W.A.
Conference dates 5-7 Jul. 2006
Title of proceedings GP & PHC 2006 : Optimising Impact : 2006 General Practice and Primary Health Care Research Conference Abstracts
Publication date 2006
Publisher Primary Health Care Research and Information Service
Place of publication [Perth, W.A.]
Summary Background : Optimising the use of electronic data offers many opportunities to health services, particularly in rural and remote areas. These include reducing the effect of distance on access to clinical information and sharing information where there are multiple service providers for a single patient. The increasing compilation of large electronic databases of patient information and the ease with which electronic information can be transferred has raised concerns about the privacy and confidentiality of such records.
Aims & rationale/Objectives : This review aims to identify legal and ethical standards for areas of electronic governance where a lack of clarity may currently impede innovation in health service delivery.
Methods : This paper describes best practices for storage and transfer of electronic patient data based on an examination of Australian legislative requirements and a review of a number of current models. This will firstly allow us to identify basic legal requirements of electronic governance as well as areas of ambiguity not fully addressed by legislation. An examination of current models will suggest recommendations for best practice in areas lacking sufficient legal guidance.
Principal findings : We have identified the following four areas of importance, and shall discuss relevant details:
1) Patients' right of ownership to electronic patient records. 2) Custodial issues with data stored in centralised health care institutions 3) IT Security, including hierarchical level access, data encryption, data transfer standards and physical security 4) Software applications usage.
Discussion : Our examination of several models of best practice for the transfer of electronic patient data, both in Australia and internationally, identifies and clarifies many unresolved issues of electronic governance. This paper will also inform future policy in this area.
Implications : Clarification will facilitate the future development of beneficial technology-based innovations by rural health services.
Presentation type : Poster
Language eng
Field of Research 111711 Health Information Systems (incl Surveillance)
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014768

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 312 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 21 Oct 2008, 14:26:52 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.