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Educational administration and social justice

Bates, Richard 2005, Educational administration and social justice, in AARE 2005 : Creative dissent: constructive solutions: proceedings of the AARE 2005 international education research conference, Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-19.

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Title Educational administration and social justice
Author(s) Bates, Richard
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2005: Sydney, N.S.W.)
Conference location Sydney, N.S.W.
Conference dates 27 November - 1 December 2005
Title of proceedings AARE 2005 : Creative dissent: constructive solutions: proceedings of the AARE 2005 international education research conference
Editor(s) Jeffrey, P.
Publication date 2005
Start page 1
End page 19
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary This paper argues that social justice is central to the pursuit of education and therefore should also be central to the practice of educational administration. Social justice in education, as elsewhere, demands both distributive justice (which remedies undeserved inequalities) and recognitional justice (which treats cultural differences with understanding and respect). But, given that cultures are always in the process of change, education is a key agency for negotiating cultural change through the exploration and negotiation of difference. Educational administration as a field can no longer escape the consideration of such issues as they are brought to the fore by the recognition of the failure of schools and school systems to ameliorate injustice in the distribution of resources and to recognise and celebrate difference as a means to social and cultural progress. We still need a model of educational administration centered around the problem of the justice and fairness of social and educational arrangements. Given the renewed interest in such issues, perhaps what was impossible twenty five years ago might now be achieved.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
ISSN 1324-9320
Language eng
Field of Research 139999 Education not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type X Not reportable
Copyright notice ©2005, AARE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014791

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.