Investigation of the factors responsible for the superior performance of male students in standardised testing at one primary school

Dinham, Steve, Buckland, Corinne, Callingham, Rosemary and Mays, Heather 2005, Investigation of the factors responsible for the superior performance of male students in standardised testing at one primary school, in AARE 2005 : Creative dissent: constructive solutions: proceedings of the AARE 2005 international education research conference, Australian Association for Research in Education, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-42.

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Title Investigation of the factors responsible for the superior performance of male students in standardised testing at one primary school
Author(s) Dinham, Steve
Buckland, Corinne
Callingham, Rosemary
Mays, Heather
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2005: Sydney, N.S.W.)
Conference location Sydney, N.S.W.
Conference dates 27 November - 1 December 2005
Title of proceedings AARE 2005 : Creative dissent: constructive solutions: proceedings of the AARE 2005 international education research conference
Editor(s) Jeffrey, P.
Publication date 2005
Start page 1
End page 42
Publisher Australian Association for Research in Education
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary The project set out to investigate one primary school where, for four years or more, boys have outperformed girls in standardized Year 3 and 5 Basic Skills Tests in literacy and numeracy, which contradicts general findings on male and female performance in standardized literacy and numeracy testing. The school placed a heavy emphasis on literacy programs, which appear to be making a difference to the boys. Over time, there has been a slight improvement in boys’ literacy performance but the greatest area of growth is generally boys’ numeracy, rather than boys’ literacy.

Further aims of the study were to isolate school-based factors, which are potentially responsible for this phenomenon, from community-based factors and to explore the possibility that, rather than boys being advantaged, girls were actually being disadvantaged by practices at the school. The approach adopted by the research team employed intensive case-study methods and ethnographic approaches, including interviews, document analysis, and structured and unstructured observation of a range of school activities.

This paper describes how the school has transformed itself, the effects that this has had upon the teaching and learning environment and the results that have been achieved in the key areas of numeracy and literacy.
ISSN 1324-9320
Language eng
Field of Research 130303 Education Assessment and Evaluation
HERDC Research category E2 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
HERDC collection year 2006
Copyright notice ©2005, AARE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014792

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Scientific and Developmental Studies in Education
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