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Strategic public land use assessment and planning in Victoria : over 30 years of trailblazing but where to from here?

Coffey, Brian, Fitzsimons, James and Gormly, Ryan 2007, Strategic public land use assessment and planning in Victoria : over 30 years of trailblazing but where to from here?, in IAG conference July 2-4 2007 : abstracts, Institute of Australian Geographers, Melbourne, Vic., pp. 12-12.

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Title Strategic public land use assessment and planning in Victoria : over 30 years of trailblazing but where to from here?
Author(s) Coffey, Brian
Fitzsimons, James
Gormly, Ryan
Conference name Institute of Australian Geographers Conference (2007 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 1-5 Jul. 2007
Title of proceedings IAG conference July 2-4 2007 : abstracts
Publication date 2007
Start page 12
End page 12
Publisher Institute of Australian Geographers
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Summary Conflict over the appropriate uses and management of public land have been a feature of the Australian political landscape for at least the past 30 years. While various attempts have been made to establish land use assessment and planning institutions in various jurisdictions, the success of these often short lived attempts at institutional approaches for managing land use conflict have been patchy at best. The experience in the State of Victoria has been somewhat different, with public land use assessment and planning having been informed by a series of independent statutory bodies since 1970 (the Land Conservation, Environment Conservation, and Victorian Environmental Assessment Councils). To some degree at least the value of this approach is indicated by the extent to which Victoria’s bioregions are now protected in conservation reserves. However, while there has always been a statutory body in operation, the roles and responsibilities of these bodies have been subject to significant legislative change, with existing bodies replaced by new bodies in 1997 and 2001. Justifications for these reforms included changing circumstances and new understandings about environmental management, as well as changing views about public administration. As a way of contributing to enhancing the design of institutions for mediating land use conflict and contributing to sustainable land use and management, this paper investigates the lessons that can be learnt from the Victorian experience by examining the implications of the changing roles and responsibilities of these institutions, and then discussing possible future directions for strategic land use planning.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 120107 Landscape Architecture
Socio Economic Objective 960999 Land and Water Management of Environments not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category E3 Extract of paper
Copyright notice ©2007, Institute of Australian Geographers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30014919

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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