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The influence of urbanisation on avifaunal composition in Melbourne

White, John, Antos, Mark, Palmer, Grant and Fitzsimons, James 2002, The influence of urbanisation on avifaunal composition in Melbourne, in Australasian Wildlife Management Society 15th Scientific Meeting and AGM, Australasian Wildlife Management Society, Australia, pp. 46-46.

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Title The influence of urbanisation on avifaunal composition in Melbourne
Author(s) White, JohnORCID iD for White, John orcid.org/0000-0002-7375-5944
Antos, Mark
Palmer, Grant
Fitzsimons, JamesORCID iD for Fitzsimons, James orcid.org/0000-0003-4277-8040
Conference name Australasian Wildlife Management Society Scientific Meeting and AGM (15th : 2002 : Camden, N.S.W.)
Conference location Camden, N.S.W.
Conference dates 9-11 December 2002
Title of proceedings Australasian Wildlife Management Society 15th Scientific Meeting and AGM
Publication date 2002
Start page 46
End page 46
Publisher Australasian Wildlife Management Society
Place of publication Australia
Summary There are many questions that need to be examined regarding the effect of urbanisation on bird communities. Surprisingly little research has focused on the urban environment, and its potential to contribute to the sustainability of biodiversity. During the Autumn of 2002 we conducted a study examining the effect of urbanisation on bird community structure and composition in the urban streetscape and park environment. In this study we compared the bird communities of urban woodland parks, streets dominated by established native trees, streets dominated by established exotic trees and new developments with limited established vegetation. Results from this study suggested that the composition of bird communities is highly variable and dependent on the type of site (ie: park or streetscape) and the type of vegetation present (native versus exotic). The most significant trend was the loss of native bird species in the transition from park to non-park habitats, and the loss of native bird species in exotic streetscapes when compared to native streetscapes. Introduced bird species showed an interesting relationship with more species being found in the new developments and the streetscapes with exotic vegetation. This relationship is further highlighted when the density of exotic species is examined. The proportion of the bird density attributed for by introduced birds differed significantly between the different habitat treatments. New developments and exotic streetscapes had significantly higher proportions of the bird density composed of introduced species when compared to parks and sites with native streetscapes. This talk will discuss the effect of urbanisation on avifaunal composition in Melbourne and suggest possible management recommendations.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.

To obtain full text, please contact the author at jfitzsimons@tnc.org
Language eng
Field of Research 060208 Terrestrial Ecology
HERDC Research category L3 Extract of paper (minor conferences)
Copyright notice ©2002, Australasian Wildlife Management Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30015624

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.