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Ecological fire regimes for the recovery and management of threatened small mammals in southern Australia

Wilson, Barbara and Friend, Gordon 2003, Ecological fire regimes for the recovery and management of threatened small mammals in southern Australia, in 3rd International Wildlife Management Congress : programme and abstracts, Landcare New Zealand, New Zealand.

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Title Ecological fire regimes for the recovery and management of threatened small mammals in southern Australia
Author(s) Wilson, Barbara
Friend, Gordon
Conference name International Wildlife Management Congress (3rd : 2003 : Christchurch, N.Z.)
Conference location Christchurch, N.Z.
Conference dates 1-5 February 2005
Title of proceedings 3rd International Wildlife Management Congress : programme and abstracts
Publication date 2003
Publisher Landcare New Zealand
Place of publication New Zealand
Summary The application of fire to fauna management, particularly for endangered species, is a significant issue for wildlife managers. Mammals respond to fire regimes including intensity, frequency and season of occurrence, and changes in fire-regimes are implicated in detrimental effects on mammal communities. For many species temporal habitat change is a key factor affecting the persistence of populations. These species require the option of colonising the shifting habitat mosaic. There is substantial evidence that species such as the native rodents New Holland Mouse (Pseudomys novaehollandiae) and Heath Rat (Pseudomys shortridgei) are early successional species dependent on such temporal habitat changes. In conrast species such as the dasyurid marsupial, Swamp Antechinus (Antechinus minimus) are late successional species, which may take up to 20 years to recolonise. In many situations ecological fire regimes need to be implemented to increase areas of suitable habitat for population expansion and reintroductions. This paper assesses research findings and the development of management actions incorporating ecological fire regimes for the recovery of Pseudomyine rodents and the Swamp Antechinus. Spatially explicit models are required to determine changes and patterns at the landscape level. The prospect of global climate change also is of significance and needs to be assessed.
Language eng
Field of Research 050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
HERDC Research category L3 Extract of paper (minor conferences)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30015697

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Ecology and Environment
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