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Effects of human activities on rocky shores of the Surf Coast Shire: scientific basis for management at the regional level

Porter, C., Wescott, Geoffrey and Fairweather, P. 2003, Effects of human activities on rocky shores of the Surf Coast Shire: scientific basis for management at the regional level, in AMSA2003 : marine biocomplexity : the 2003 Annual Conference of The Australian Marine Sciences Association, Australian Marine Science Association, Toowong, Qld., pp. 135-135.

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Title Effects of human activities on rocky shores of the Surf Coast Shire: scientific basis for management at the regional level
Author(s) Porter, C.
Wescott, Geoffrey
Fairweather, P.
Conference name Australian Marine Science Association. Conference (2003 : Brisbane, Queensland)
Conference location Brisbane, Qld.
Conference dates 9-11 July 2003
Title of proceedings AMSA2003 : marine biocomplexity : the 2003 Annual Conference of The Australian Marine Sciences Association
Publication date 2003
Start page 135
End page 135
Publisher Australian Marine Science Association
Place of publication Toowong, Qld.
Summary The Surf Coast Shire in regional Victoria contains some of the most spectacular coastline in Australia, running from Point Impossible in the east to just west of the resort town of Lorne. The Surf Coast Shire council is committed to ecologically sustainable tourism based on its coastal assets, including the important intertidal environments. The challenge for the Shire is to protect and enhance the biodiversity of its intertidal areas whilst allowing for their sustainable use as a critical component of the local economy. In order to do this the Council needed to identify the conservation values of intertidal areas within the shire and assess the impacts that current human use has on these values. The impacts of shellfish collecting on rocky shores were identified as an issue of particular concern. We have conducted a research project with the Shire to provide a scientific basis for management decisions. The principal aims of this project were to: (1) determine the patterns of human use of intertidal habitats; (2) measure the impacts of human usage on biological communities and species populations; and (3) to identify intertidal sites of regional conservation significance for the Surf Coast Shire. Surveys of human usage identified reef walking, looking in rock pools and fossicking as major uses of rocky shores within the Surf Coast. This poster reports the effects of this usage on gastropod populations of rocky shores within the Surf Coast Shire. A small proportion of visitors collected intertidal organisms. Shores were categorized as high or low use based on total numbers of people observed at each shore over the first year of the project. Mean size and catch per unit effort were compared for several gastropod species between high use and low use shores. The results presented here show that the populations of some gastropod species are of smaller mean size and less abundant on high use shores than on low use shores. There was also a noticeable difference in degree of effect detected between sandstone and mudstone shores. The implications of these results are briefly discussed in terms of management options available to the Shire.
Language eng
Field of Research 050209 Natural Resource Management
HERDC Research category L3 Extract of paper (minor conferences)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30015700

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Ecology and Environment
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