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To stay or to go? 'At risk' young women speak about their influences and experiences in making decisions about post-compulsory schooling

Allard, Andrea and McLeod, Julie 2003, To stay or to go? 'At risk' young women speak about their influences and experiences in making decisions about post-compulsory schooling, in ACSA 2003 : Conversactions : conversations and actions, Australian Curriculum Studies Association, Adelaide, S. Aust., pp. 1-18.

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Title To stay or to go? 'At risk' young women speak about their influences and experiences in making decisions about post-compulsory schooling
Author(s) Allard, Andrea
McLeod, Julie
Conference name Australian Curriculum Studies Association. Conference (2003 : Adelaide, S. Aust.)
Conference location Adelaide, S. Aust.
Conference dates 28-30 October 2003
Title of proceedings ACSA 2003 : Conversactions : conversations and actions
Publication date 2003
Start page 1
End page 18
Publisher Australian Curriculum Studies Association
Place of publication Adelaide, S. Aust.
Summary Recent research indicates that young women who leave school early (ie at or before year 10) are the group most 'at risk' of becoming only marginally attached to the labour force or unemployed. Young women from low socio-economic backgrounds are more often those who 'choose' to leave schooling, often for complex reasons, some of which are only marginally connected to their schooling experiences. In order to better understand-and address-the needs of this cohort, it is necessary to examine the multi layered connections between students' lives in and out of school.

This paper reports on the initial stage of a three year ARC-funded study, 'Young women negotiating from the margins of education and work.' In interviews and focus groups, young women identified as 'at risk' of leaving school early speak about the factors that have influenced their decisions. We examine the data with specific reference to the question: what type of social capital do these young women deploy in making their choices? Recent research (Croninger & Lee, 2001) suggest that teachers' support and guidance are a form of social capital that can make a difference, particularly in regards to students from lower socio-economic backgrounds. We discuss the young women's and teachers' interview data in light of recent debates about social capital and education.
Language eng
Field of Research 160809 Sociology of Education
HERDC Research category L2 Full written paper - non-refereed (minor conferences)
Copyright notice ©2003, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30015736

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.