Sewing society? Stitch’nbitch, cyberfeminism & the new materiality (or why cybergrrrls do plain and purls)

Minahan, Stella and Wolfram Cox, Julie 2005, Sewing society? Stitch’nbitch, cyberfeminism & the new materiality (or why cybergrrrls do plain and purls), in SCOS 2005 : Standing Conference on Organizational Symbolism XXIII : excess and organization, Department of Industrial Management and Organization, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.

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Title Sewing society? Stitch’nbitch, cyberfeminism & the new materiality (or why cybergrrrls do plain and purls)
Author(s) Minahan, Stella
Wolfram Cox, Julie
Conference name Standing Conference on Organizational Symbolism (23rd : 2005 : Stockholm, Sweden)
Conference location Stockholm, Sweden
Conference dates 8-10 July 2005
Title of proceedings SCOS 2005 : Standing Conference on Organizational Symbolism XXIII : excess and organization
Editor(s) Gustafsson, Claes
Rehn, Alf
Sköld, David
Publication date 2005
Publisher Department of Industrial Management and Organization, Royal Institute of Technology
Place of publication Stockholm, Sweden
Summary A social movement known as Stitch’nBitch has emerged around the globe. This movement, mainly of women, is based in local, third places, such as hotels and clubs, and virtually. Using the Internet, particularly Blogs, the women meet to knit, stitch and talk. These groups use technology as an enabler and resource exchange. In this presentation, we suggest that such groups may be a response to consumerism in the Information Society, which has resulted in profound changes in the way people live, communicate and connect with one another and which has also provided a trigger for new, more community-focused activities using craft production, rather than consumption, as a vehicle. Craft production, or ‘make it yourself’ is consistent with concepts of voluntary simplicity (Etzioni, 1998) and non-materialistic satisfactions (Shaw and Newholm, 2002). We introduce five themes to assist in the development of a research agenda into this new form of material culture, discussing (1) remedial, (2) progressive, (3) resistance, (4) nostalgic, and (5) ironic possibilities.
ISBN 9171781137
9789171781130
Language eng
Field of Research 200204 Cultural Theory
Socio Economic Objective 970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
HERDC Research category L3 Extract of paper (minor conferences)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30015819

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Management and Marketing
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